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by: Ginger Schlueter - Wednesday, July 17, 2019

I’ve spent the last two days in Montreal, learning all about Genetec but also learning tidbits of powerful information about the security industry. I will be sharing my thoughts, observations and knowledge in the days to come, so stay tuned to our website. Here is a preview of what’s to come:

We sometimes take for granted how “precious an average day is and how much it takes just to make a day average,” Andrew Elvish, vice president, marketing & product management, Genetec said when it comes to ensuring safety and security each and every day. Further, we have to “make sure everything happens every day.”

Genetec does its part to ensure everything happens every day by creating security solutions as well as partnering with others who do the same. The company has a global footprint in which they grow organically and currently, it employees 1,500 people of whom speak 23 different languages. The company also invests 28 percent of their topline into R&D. Expansion efforts are focused on entering a market at the right place at the right time with an emphasis on building channels and channel partners.

Yesterday was filled with open, authentic discussions around hot topics within the industry with Genetec employees as well as people from outside the organization who work with Genetec. Topics of discussion included: the role of privacy in a digital democracy, the future of AI in security, privacy matters in security, ALPR and the role of parking in cities and a panel discussion about cannabis and security.

Today, I get the unique opportunity to visit the Montreal Casino’s command center to see security in action, demonstrating how everything happens every day.

Again, stay tuned to SSN’s website and print publication for in-depth coverage and knowledge sharing of this event.

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by: Ginger Schlueter - Wednesday, July 10, 2019

Featured in Time magazine’s “Top 10 Public-Service Announcements,” the popular one from the 1960s, 70s and 80s went something like this: “It’s 10pm … do you know where your children are?” Being the ripe age of 42, I vaguely remember the tail-end of this campaign where a celebrity or publicly known person — Joan Rivers, Jane Seymour, Darryl Strawberry, Paul Stanley, etc. —would appear on the TV screen at 10pm or 11pm, depending on location, and ask this almost sinister-like question of moms and dads waiting for their dose of the nightly news. During this time, several cities across the U.S. had adopted new curfew laws and this was the late-night reminder to parents. 

Since then, it’s been parodied several times: CNBC asks, “It’s 4 o’clock … do you know where your money is?” while Monster.com asks, “It’s 6 o’clock … do you know where your career is?” And, my personal favorite: “It’s 10am … do you know where your coffee is?” While these are fun and playful sayings and marketing tactics, there’s a lot of truth to be discovered by answering that simple, historical question that remains ingrained in society. So, I ask you, the IoT manufacturer, the security installer, the IoT user: “It’s 10pm … do you know what your IoT devices are doing?” If you can’t answer that question, you may have a security/privacy issue. 

In response to IoT devices, their security/privacy issues, and the lack of laws and governance of these little electronic baubles, several organizations have developed IoT “guidelines” to help developers create, manufacturers build, and consumers purchase and use more secure IoT products:

Security Systems Engineering: Considerations for a Multidisciplinary Approach in the Engineering of Trustworthy Security Systems

By: National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) 

This publication, targeted toward security engineering professionals, provides principles and concepts, and how these can be effectively applied to the creation of IoT devices and other security-related device. It is recognized that no system can be engineered to by absolutely secure and trustworthy, but rather, the focus should be on “adequate security,” making sure the device address the users security concerns. 

With several free, downloadable publications related specifically to IoT security, the IoT Security Foundation is on a mission to “Build Secure, Buy Secure and Be Secure.” They offer a tool called “IoTSF Compliance Checklist” that helps IoT manufacturers create devices that are within contemporary best practices. The checklist opens as an Excel document, with tabs that take the person through the entire process of compliance, starting with assessment steps; includes device hardware, software, operating systems and interfaces; and concluding with issues such as encryption, privacy, cloud and network elements and device ownership transfer. 

IoT Security Guidance

By: The Open Web Application Security Project (OWASP)

With the familiar look of a Wikipedia page, this guide speaks directly to IoT manufacturers, developers and consumers, offering specific and general recommendations. It’s laid out in an easy-to-read chart and bullet point format. It addresses 10 key categories such as insecure web interface, poor physical security, privacy concerns and insecurity cloud interface; tells what security issues the manufacturer, developer and consumer should be aware of; and offers recommendations to remedy such issues. 

Future Proofing the Connected World

By: Cloud Security Alliance’s IoT Working Group

This PDF guide offers 13 steps to developing secure IoT products, but it also describes exactly why IoT security is needed and addresses some of the common security challenges for IoT users. The 13-step process starts with developing a secure methodology and ends with performing internal and external security reviews. 

IoT Security Guidelines and Assessment

By: GSMA

The goal of these guidelines and assessment is to help create a secure IoT market with trusted, reliable and scalable services. The guidelines include 85 secure design, development and deployment recommendations; security challenges, attack models and risk assessments, and examples while the assessment, based on a structured approach yet providing a flexible framework, address the diversity of the IoT market while addressing the whole ecosystem.

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by: Ginger Schlueter - Wednesday, June 26, 2019

Being a part of the security industry as a journalist, it intrigues me as to the wealth of security-related knowledge floating around out there in cyberspace, magazine articles, books, newspapers, tv … any and all media outlets really. Take just a moment and think about this: at any given time, we can access information via our smart devices about any topic we choose. Seriously, let that soak in for a minute … 

The conclusion? Knowledge is power, as the saying goes; there’s even a Twitter hashtag dedicated to the adage: #KnowledgeIsPower. And, as I learned from my dad, it’s the one thing no one can take away from you. But I want to challenge this with: knowledge is power, but taking action based on that knowledge is powerful. Knowing something is only half the battle; it’s action taken because of knowledge that creates power-filled outcomes that truly supports, and adds truth and value to this concept.

With that in mind, The Monitoring Association (TMA) has joined with APCO International, the world’s oldest and largest organization of public safety communication professionals, calling on us — security industry professionals — to support a bill. To make an educated decision, we must gain knowledge: 

Name of the bill: 9-1-1 SAVES Act.

Type of bill: bipartisan, bicameral, simple and zero-cost.

What the bill would do: fix the federal classification by appropriately grouping Public Safety Telecommunicators with other “protective” occupations. 

Why this is important: our federal government currently classifies 9-1-1 operator positions as administrative/clerical, in the same group as secretaries, office clerks and taxicab dispatchers. While 9-1-1 operators do sit at desks, working on computers and phones, would you agree or disagree that this is an inaccurate classification and a disservice to the lifesaving work and dedication of these professionals?

TMA’s and APCO’s argument: Public Safety Telecommunicators should be classified as Protective Service Occupations. This includes a broad range of “protective” occupations such as lifeguards, gambling surveillance officers, fish and game wardens, parking enforcement workers, firefighters, playground monitors and more. These organizations believe reclassification is common sense, and about getting Public Safety Telecommunicators the recognition they deserve for the work they do every day to protect and save the lives of the public and first responders. 

Now that you have the knowledge, it’s time to take action. Here are your two choices: 

  1. Do nothing. After all, not taking action is in essence making a decision.
  2. Send a letter. APCO’s website offers a dynamic form where individuals can provide key contact information and the appropriate letter is sent automatically to your U.S. senators and representatives. (I just did. It literally takes less than 1 minute.) 
 
by: Ginger Schlueter - Wednesday, June 19, 2019

According to urbandictionary.com, the somewhat “official” definition of “trippin’” means “when someone is overreacting or getting all ‘bent out of shape’ over something small.” And while most of the more popular IoT devices present themselves as a small physical footprint — for example, Google Home is only 3.79 inches in diameter, 5.62 inches in height and only 1.05 lbs. while on the other side of the ring, fighting for market share is the Amazon Echo Plus Voice Controller, 2nd Generation, standing at 5.8 inches tall, 3.9 inches in diameter and weighing in at 27.5 ounces — they can pack a huge, unsettling punch when it comes to security. 

Having taken an interest in IoT devices in terms of security, I’ve written previously about what connected smart home IoT devices are REALLY doing as well as covered IoT devices from the perspective of trust, in which California is the first state to pass a bill, Senate Bill No. 327, that will require IoT manufactures to equip devices with “reasonable” security features, effective in the year 2020. Maybe government control of IoT devices is a step in the right direction, maybe not, but the fact remains that, according to a report from Zscaler, over 90 percent of data transactions from 270 different IoT devices developed by 153 device manufacturers, including smart watches, digital home assistants, medical devices, smart glasses, industry control devices and more are UNencrytped! This exposes these devices to hackers intercepting traffic and stealing or manipulating data, known as man-in-the-middle (MitM) attacks. 

Let’s take a moment to explore a real-life MitM attack and how these attacks can rob people just like you and me of our security. 

Meet Paul and Ann Lupton from England: happy, proud grandparents of baby Oliver, who had purchased a flat (aka apartment) in south London for Oliver’s mother and their daughter, Tracey. After the birth of Oliver, Tracey moved to a bigger home, so the Luptons decided to sell the flat for approximately $429,200 … quite a nice chunk of change and apparently some “others” thought so too.

Perry Hay & Co. in Surrey emailed Mr. Lupton requesting his bank account details for the money from the sale to be paid into, and he replied, sending his Barclays bank account number and sort code (a six-digit number that identifies the bank, in this case Barclays, and the branch where the account is held). A seemingly innocent action that led to his email getting intercepted by fraudsters who posed as Mr. Lupton quickly emailing Perry Hay & Co. again from Mr. Lupton’s email account instructing the company to disregard the previous banking information and send the money to a different account.

The sale completed and Mr. Lupton, none the wiser, sent the funds to the criminals’ account totaling almost half a million U.S. dollars! 

Mr. Lupton responded by contacting Perry Hay & Co. and the crime was (very fortunately) discovered, and it was fairly easy since Barclays was the account provider for all three involved —the Luptons, Perry Hay & Co. and the fraudsters (hmmm, maybe not too smart on their part?!). The Luptons ended up retrieving about $342,000 of their money. 

While the Lupton’s situation didn’t involve IoT, per se, and it did have a rather happy ending since they got some of their money returned, it demonstrates what could happen if a hacker taps into one of your IoT devices, your smart home speaker, for example, and listens while you discuss private issues — account numbers, addresses to schools your children attend, when you’re going on vacation so your home can be burglarized and the like — with your household.

By no means am I an IoT “hater,” (as Urban Dictionary so eloquently puts it). I understand the useful and positive impacts these devices can have on the everyday; however, I do believe security should be the top priority when introducing an IoT device into your life. 

Maybe more manufacturers should be "trippin’" and then “encrytpin’” their IoT devices’ data!

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by: Ginger Schlueter - Monday, June 10, 2019

From the showroom floor and education sessions to motivational speakers, one-on-one interviews and central stage talks lead by SSN as the premier media sponsor of ESX, the goal of #PassionateSecurity was more than fulfilled. In my opinion, this passion for security was best seen as industry peers openly shared their experiences with others via conversations, interactive education sessions, networking events and receptions—even if that meant sharing with the competition, all in the name of keeping security as top priority.  

One of the unique things that happens at industry events is an overarching theme will emerge, one in which “everyone” seems to be talking about. At ESX 2019, that was the customer and employee experience. This takes empathy and the ability for security professionals to put themselves into the shoes of their customers as well as their employees to understand how they feel and what they truly need. The result? Employees feel appreciated, leading them to embrace a “servant” mentality toward customers, doing whatever it takes to ensure nothing but greatness, which fosters excellent customer experiences when working with your company. (Hence, #PassionateSecurity.)

Case in point: I was honored to moderate the education session “Sales vs. Operations: 6 Ways to Turn Conflict into Collaboration,” where Jeremy Bates of Bates Security, Paul Hevesy of Stanley Security; and Suvankar Roy of Xfinity Home shared some amazing tips on how to bond together sales and ops teams so that the customer benefits. One easy-to-implement tip presented was “Thankful Thursdays,” where people on the sales team identify someone they are thankful for on the ops team and why, and of course, the ops team does the same for the sales team, and then voice this during cross departmental meetings. This fosters a culture of appreciation and gratitude within the company, which spills over into customer interactions by sales and ops team members, and helps to enhance the overall customer experience. 

And, speaking of unique … this year at ESX, SSN live-broadcasted the central stage talks, hosted by Editor Paul Ragusa, via Twitter. Below you will find a list of informative quotes that emerged from each on-stage security professional. Simply click on their name to be transported to their specific talk to gather even more valuable tips, tricks and insights. It’s like sitting in your living room with knowledgeable security professionals, sharing a cup of coffee and chatting about the industry! In fact, grab a cup of coffee and sip along as you view! And, please don’t forget to “like,” share and comment on each one.

ESX 2019 Central Stage Talks

“The two touchpoints today are the voice of the customer and the customer experience. At the end of the day, I think it’s the personal relationships that are going to differentiate those well-sought-after companies.” 

Ivan Spector, president, TMA

“They [the customer] want the latest video camera, door locks, but at the same time they don’t want to have 50,000 apps. They want simplicity.” 

Celia Besore, executive director, TMA

“Really what we need are salespeople who can ask better questions: what’s the problem we’re trying to solve? What is it that they [the customer] is trying to accomplish? Not just be so product oriented but solution oriented.” 

Gretchen Gordon, president, Braveheart Sales Performance

“One of the strategies we use is to let citizens know how a policy like verified response, which means that it confirms some criminal or attempted criminal activity before the police will respond, will affect them.” 

Stan Martin, executive director, SIAC

“Almost all the features that we do in our panel, all the technologies that we put in there, are a direct result of listening to our customer’s feedback.”

Jeremy Mclerran, senior director of marketing at Qolsys Inc.

“ … there’s DIY and DIT, “do it together,” and I think dealers are figuring out how that’s going to work … customers are taking some responsibility for their systems … I think the more that there is opportunity for the consumer to become aware of their security system and some of the features it delivers for them, whether it be convenience featured of peace of mind features, the more they’re willing to spend to add onto and grow, I think that will grow our entire industry.”

Mark Hillenburg, executive director of marketing, DMP

“On average, consumers spend four hours or more installing their DIY security system in the home, so the market tends to push toward ‘do it for me.’” 

Dina Abdelrazik, senior analyst, Parks Associates

“We [ESA] are launching an assessment exam which I think is something we’ve needed in the industry for a long time … because we have so many training courses, we have this vast array of test questions. So, we took all that information and put it together in a software package; we can actually have a technician take an exam, and that will give us the information we need to understand where their strengths are from a technical standpoint and where their weaknesses are. And, then we can develop a roadmap for the member to put that technician on a path to improve their weaknesses and maybe even accentuate their strengths.” 

Merlin, Guilbeau, executive director, ESA

“One of the great things around the smart home being more common and more useful is it brings a lot of awareness. It wasn’t too long ago, we’d have to explain to a client or prospective client what was possible with their system; whereas now, people understand you could control your lights with your phone. You can decide whether or not that’s of interest to you.” 

Mike Jagger, president, Provident Security 

“On the commercial side, it’s really all about cameras; it’s really about video and everything that video can do … that’s not just driven by market demand, but it’s also driven by legislation and local governance.” 

Steve Firestone, president, Select Security 

 
by: Ginger Schlueter - Tuesday, June 4, 2019

It’s my first visit to Indiana and it’s amazing to be spending my time at ESX 2019 learning about new trends and happenings in the electronic security industry. The day opened with a breakfast panel: Nate Williams from Kleiner Perkins and Alex Pachikov of Sunflower Labs, both of which highlighted focusing on the customer as well as the customer experience as it relates to security solutions created and offered. Education sessions followed and then Rick Rigsby took the stage as the luncheon keynote speaker, who divulged getting back to the basics when it comes to excelling in the security industry as well as life in general. Rigsby’s motivation that he shared with the audience can be experienced on Twitter @SSN_Ginger. 

Once the showroom floor opened, our Editor, Paul Ragusa, took the central stage, interviewing leaders within the industry. The knowledge shared can be seen on my Twitter @SSN_Ginger. 

Tomorrow’s agenda is filled with time on the showroom floor, education and more motivational keynote speakers, so stay tuned for a recap of things learned at ESX 2019 and be sure to follow me @SSN_Ginger for live Tweets and videos of the action! 

 
by: Ginger Schlueter - Wednesday, May 29, 2019

Things are heating up here in the Lone Star State which means air conditioning bills are about to go up, water will be consumed by the gallons, the smell of sunscreen and sun block will be everywhere, but most importantly, it means the Cyber:Secured Forum will be here before we know it at The Westin Dallas Park Central, July 29-31.

Senior Technical Director for NSA’s Cybersecurity Threat Operations Center (NCTOC), David Hogue, will be taking the stage on July 31st, 11:30am to 1:30pm, keynoting about fostering innovation and public-private partnerships in cyber defense. 

“The NSA is one of the most forward-thinking security organizations in the world,” Joe Gittens, director of standards, SIA told SSN. “David Hogue has been a technical expert on many of the agency’s cybersecurity threat mitigation efforts and a lead researcher on a number of high-profile breaches, like the Sony Pictures hack.” 

Attendees can look forward to the following take-aways from Hogue: 

  • Principles on how NSA is approaching cybersecurity innovation
  • How the security industry can partner in this overall mission; and
  • Ways the industry can develop solutions for: managing gateways and cyber perimeters, hardening endpoints to meet best practices and standards, embrace comprehensive and automated threat intelligence and cultivate a culture of curiosity and innovation. 

 

“I believe there is not a better voice to educate our industry on the emerging threats that enemies are deploying to interfere with the ever-connected nature of our nation,” Gittens said. “Security battlefronts are constantly changing, and David’s presentation will offer rare insights into how partnership and innovation within the security industry can lead to increasing success in the public and private sectors.”

I look forward to seeing everyone at Cyber:Secured and taking lots of notes on what Hogue has to offer! 

 
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by: Ginger Schlueter - Wednesday, May 22, 2019

Earlier this month, I attended Catalyst 2019, hosted by Affiliated Monitoring, at the “happiest place on Earth,” where “magic” literally happens moment by moment. With two main goals—education and networking/relationship building—this year’s Catalyst provided a ton of “magical” nuggets that all PERS and mPERS professionals need to know.

Need to Know Data

Daniel Oppenheim, Affiliated Monitoring’s CEO, pumping up the audience with his keynote and survey results from Edmonds Group: in 2017, PERs signed up 1.4 million service customers. This data is significant, because up until then, the PERs industry didn’t have good data revealing the size of this niche industry.

Oppenheim continued on, explaining how professional monitoring protects our 911 system: Of the 3.4 million active PERs customers, 51 percent press their button every month. This results in 1,734,000 professional monitoring interventions per month, saving 166,464 lives per month and preventing 1,567,536 calls to 911 per month. To continue “protecting seniors and giving peace of mind to caregivers,” Oppenheim suggested the need for professional monitoring companies to partner with government entities.

Need to Know Challenges

The top three PERs company challenges are:

1.    Telecom changes – The National Center for Health Statistics found 24 percent of those aged 65 and older have do not have a landline phone and within the next five years, VoIP adoption is expected to see a 124 percent growth rate.
2.    The 4G transition – Carriers say there will be no new 3G Sim activations after THIS summer, with the 3G network forecasted to shut down by February 2022.
3.    “Self-monitoring” and overcoming customer objections – Educating customers as to why PERs and professional monitoring is needed when there are so many smart devices on the market today, including smart speakers and watches, and emergency alert apps.

Need to Know Telemarketing Insights

Michele Shuster, partner, MacMurray, Petersen & Shuster, LLP took the Catalyst stage, gave some important advice regarding:

•    Third-party lead generation (gen) – if you purchase leads, know exactly where the company is getting those leads from; make sure lead gen contracts include “callable leads,” meaning the consumer understood that by providing their information they will be contacted; train your staff on how to make calls lawfully and audit using scrubbers. Shuster also said if you receive a letter threatening to get sued because one of your company representatives called a consumer, do not ignore the letters; be proactive by obtaining legal advice.
•    Consumer data – if your company has collected sensitive data about consumers and that information isn’t needed, get rid of it.
•    STIR/SHAKEN – make it a point to understand this new technology standard to ensure calling numbers aren’t spoofed, or the calling telephone number is not altered.

Shuster explained that basically, a trust token is issued from a telephone company, authenticating all the company’s phone numbers. The type of token issued dictates whether your call will get through without harmful labels being placed on it, or even getting blocked.

Need to Know Business Operation Tips

Richard Brooks, president, healthcare division, ConnectAmerica, gave the executive keynote, with business tips interspersed throughout:
•    Your teams make you successful; make sure each team member knows their jobs and their importance to the overall success of your PERs business.
•    Build “on-ground” relationships; you have to actually “touch” people so get “feet on the street.”
•    Your employees are your most important asset because they talk to your customers, sell your products and serve people.
•    Employees need to understand everything they do can impact a life.
•    As your PERs business grows, it’s impossible to do everything, so hire a management team to help with leadership.
•    For small PERs businesses, emphasize you’re the “local PERs provider” because seniors like local.
•    Local relationships are key for small PERs companies getting bought by larger companies. Know the key local people, interact and establish a good relationship. Brooks also advised keeping great books and records, staying on top of cash receipts.

Attending events is an exciting part of my managing editor role here at Security Systems News, which suites me to a tee because I love learning and then sharing my newfound knowledge with our amazing readers.

by: Ginger Schlueter - Wednesday, May 15, 2019

For the past few weeks, I have been rather intrigued with IoT devices, smart homes, and security and safety of people in this context. (After all, aren’t our homes supposed to be our safe haven … our place of escape from the crazy, hurried world we live in?) After perusing the internet regarding this topic, I thought I had read about almost everything imaginable, but I was thrown a curve ball by a man, Geoffrey A. Fowler, technology columnist, The Washington Post, who literally made a song out of the recordings Alexa had of him! (Click here to listen.) 

Fowler reported that he listened to four years of his Alexa archive that highlighted fragments of his life: spaghetti-timer requests, houseguests joking and random snippets of a once-popular TV show. Alexa even captured and recorded sensitive conversations—a family discussion about medication and a friend conducting a business deal—apparently triggered by Alexa’s “wake word” to start recording. So, why are tech companies recording and saving our voice data? According to Amazon, “when using an Alexa-enabled device, the voice recordings associated with your account are used to improve the accuracy of the results.” 

Fact or fiction? Maybe both, because another main reason is to train their artificial intelligence (AI). 

I may be going out on a limb here, but if people’s voice data is being recorded and USED without their knowledge, isn’t this an invasion of privacy? I say, “Yes, without a doubt!” Not only that, but shouldn’t these tech companies hire and pay people for their voice data to train their AI? I mean, “free” saves the companies money, but to the extent of people’s private conversations and information being recorded and used without permission?  

So, what can be done? Defeating the purpose of Alexa would be to mute its microphone or unplug it, but, in my opinion, if I was going to have a private conversation, that would be better than putting my personal business out there. Another option would be to delete Alexa voice recordings, but Amazon warns

  • “If you delete voice recordings, it could degrade your experience when using the device.” 
  • “Deleting voice recordings does not delete your Alexa Messages.” 
  • “You may be able to review and play back voice recordings as the deletion request is being processed.” 

(I wonder what a “degraded Alexa experience” entails and I also wonder how long it takes to process a deletion request, as during this time voice data can be used.)

For me personally, I will stick with the “old-fashioned” way of living to preserve and protect my privacy—physically stand up, walk over to the window and close/open the blinds by hand; set alarms manually on my smartphone or built-in timer on my microwave; and even use the remote to turn the TV off and on, change channels and control the volume. 

By the way, don’t forget to listen to your own Alexa archive here or in the Alexa app: Settings > Alexa Account > Alexa Privacy. What all does Alexa have on you? 

 
by: Ginger Schlueter - Wednesday, May 8, 2019

As the Jaws warning theme song plays in my head, along with the ‘Baby Shark’ song that became an internet sensation, patterns of “do-do-da-do” fill my head as I anticipate the first-ever Affiliated Monitoring Shark Tank at Catalyst 2019. I’m excited to be heading out to sunny Orlando’s Four Seasons at Walt Disney World Resort® to get a first-hand look at the PERs/mPERs niche of the security industry. This is Affiliated’s 4th Catalyst Conference and I feel congratulations are in order, so on behalf of the SSN team, “Congratulations Affiliated Monitoring!” 

As of February 28, 2019, at noon, via email, I got word that teams from over 70 companies were registered to attend this event. This is a marvelous turn out all on its own, but the final attendee count is yet to be determined since the event doesn’t even start until today! Soon, golfers will be yelling “four” as they swing their carefully chosen clubs at Tranquilo Golf Course on the Four Seasons Resort to determine who reigns supreme on the course in best ball with additional challenges for longest drive and closest to the pin. Afterwards tips for free and almost free tools, tricks and marketing strategies to grow a PERs business will be presented with a welcome cocktail reception closely following at the Four Seasons’ Pool Bar & Grill all on Wednesday, May 8th.

Then, bright and early on Thursday, May 9th, the live action will start on my Twitter feed @SSN_Ginger, and continue on until the end of the conference, sharing the highlights of each day. Thursday will be a PERs-related montage of Daniel Oppenheim of Affiliated Monitoring delivering the day’s keynote: a view of the demographic changes driving the growth in the PERs industry along with PERs-specific trends; presentations; sessions; and networking intermingled with coffee and food. 

Of course, on Friday, May 10th, there will be coffee and food, but more important, taking the stage is Executive Keynote Speaker and President, Healthcare Division at Connect America, Richard Brooks, an industry icon with story after story of priceless knowledge about leading and growing multiple PERs and telehealth businesses. Attendees will gain insights to take their PERs business to next level by learning the top things no one ever tells about when scaling a PERs company. Attendees are then invited to “swim” on over to the Shark Tank where innovators will come face-to-face with the Sharks, industry veterans who will listen to contestants’ pitches and decide if they are interested! 

Innovators include the brave: 

  • Jean Anne Booth, CEO, UnaliWear
  • Steve, Chazin, VP, product, Alarm.com 
  • Mara Perlmutter, founder & CEO, TrelaWear.

Sharks include the blood-hungry: 

  • Geoff Gross, president, Medical Guardian
  • Rob Flippi, CEO, MobileHelp
  • Sindee Shaulinski, general manager, medical monitoring, Doyle Security Systems.

I personally can’t wait to see (and Tweet about) what goes on in THIS tank! 

The day, and Catalyst 2019, will conclude with Brainstorming Roundtables with voted-on topics to include: 

  • Growing Your Connected Health Portfolio
  • Managing the 4G Transition
  • Payor Sources: Medicare, Medicaid & Beyond
  • Secrets of Reducing Customer Churn

This year’s Catalyst seems to be full of learning and building relationships while taking time to have fun. Here are some tips to get the most out of Catalyst 2019: 

  1. Follow me on Twitter @SSN_Ginger to keep up with live highlights of Catalyst 2019. 
  2. Bring a notepad and writing utensil to take notes of the amazing knowledge your will learn. 
  3. Before Friday, May 10th review the Brainstorming Roundtable topics and create questions to ask during each. Write them down in your notebook and leave space below each one for the answer to keep your notes organized.
  4. If you’re escaping to Epcot for the scavenger hunt, casual or athletic clothes are recommended. Sneakers are REQUIRED by Disney; NO open toed shoes allowed. 
  5. Download the official Catalyst App to stay connected at the conference.

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