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by: Ginger Hill - Tuesday, November 19, 2019

Some studies have found that the human brain actually processes words by recognizing each word heard through the ears and seen with the eyes as an individual picture. I know when I’m listening to a podcast or lecture, the radio, reading something, etc. and I hear or see a word that is delightful to me, my mind engages, blooming a series of images that represent that word. In other words, I see pictures in my mind related to what I heard or saw.

Let’s say, for example, you just heard the word ‘cybersecurity.” What images popped into your mind? For me, it’s images of hooded people in basements crouched over a laptop, padlocks, computers with data flying out of it as if it’s being stolen, etc. 

Believe it or not, how people “see” the word cybersecurity is a big deal, as images can conjure up false realities of what it actually is and encompasses. And, with digital being such a major part of our lives, pictures/images provide the visual communication we are accustomed to.

The Daylight Security Research Lab, part of the Center for Long-Term Cybersecurity at U.C. Berkeley, compiled a dataset of the most common cybersecurity-related images used on the Internet during a two-year period of Google Image Search results for 28 terms related to privacy and cyber security. Every week for two years, the research team entered terms, such as cybersecurity, camera surveillance, camera privacy and more (you can see all 28 here) into a custom Google Search Engine (Google CSE). For each term searched, 100 images were scraped using a script, resulting in three sets of search terms each aimed at the following: 

  • Set 1: general technologies, technical themes or topics;
  • Set 2: representations of abstract ideas or practices; and
  • Set 3: Dave Eggar’s book, “The Circle,” which at the time of the study was a best-seller and represented topics of interest related to this study. 

Though the Berkeley researchers are continuing to analyze the seven gigabytes of collected imagery data, preliminary analyzations found that the most common colors used in cybersecurity imagery online are blue, grey, black and red, while padlocks and abstract network diagrams are the most common images. 

In my opinion, fear should not be the driver that encourages people to take action to stay safe. Yet, this research shows that the majority of images and colors related to cybersecurity do just that. Dark colors, in this case, blue, grey and black, are frequently associated with evil, mystery and fear. Red is often associated with danger. Just these four colors alone can communicate and evoke fear, and when used along with padlocks and images of computer networks, the message is clear: cybersecurity = fear. 

People should know the truth about cybersecurity —in words and in pictures — so that they can make educated decisions on how to best protect themselves, not fear mongered into it. Therefore, it’s important to create and use realistic imagery and pictures when it comes to discussing and presenting cybersecurity online. 

Do you agree or disagree? Why or why not?

by: Ginger Hill - Wednesday, November 6, 2019

Kind of like the once elusive sound of a car alarm in a packed parking lot in the 80s to the flooded number of parked cars with car alarms today, as is the discussion of cyberattacks, cybercrimes, data breaches and such. 

I remember being around seven years old and in our local K-Mart parking lot with my mom, when a sound emerged from somewhere among the parked cars. That’s the first time I had ever heard a car alarm. Today, a car alarm is an annoyance at best and not really “heard” by many people anymore. 

Likening that to the cyber world, I remember becoming so intrigued with cybersecurity, cyberattacks, cybercrimes and such about 10 years ago, when I became heavily involved in social media. It was something exciting and different than had ever been seen before in true crime stories that intrigue and whet the public’s palates. Fast-forward to today, and it’s become common-place to see these types of stories throughout all aspects of media reporting — online articles and blogs; social media platforms; TV news stories; documentaries; radio reporting; etc., so much so, that people are already or becoming numb to it, passing it off as just “one of those things we have to deal with in life.” However, especially as a security professional, cyberattacks and data breaches not only shouldn’t be taken lightly, they absolutely cannot be, as they have literally ruined business and people. So, I ask you: “Are you ready and prepared?” 

Sad to say, but if you’re like the majority of the over 800 CISOs and other senior executives across North America, Europe and Asia, surveyed (commissioned by FireEye and delivered by Kantar, an independent market research organization), the answer is unfortunately, “no.” The study found that: 

  • 51 percent of surveyed organizations don’t believe they are ready or would respond appropriately to a cyberattack or data breach; 
  • 29 percent of these organizations with response plans in place haven’t tested or updated them in the last 12 months or more; and
  • 76 percent of the organizations plan to increase their cyber security budget in 2020. 

The survey also highlighted varying global viewpoints. In Asia, Japan plans to prioritize detection capabilities in 2020 and expresses concerns regarding cloud security, while Korea believes nation states are the most likely source of cyberattacks. The U.S. is leading the transition to cloud; Germany is concerned about cloud security and France believes employee training to be a top protection measure. 

I urge you, don’t become a parked car in a sea of cyberattacks and data breaches with your alarm going off and people just walking by like nothing is wrong. Prepare by creating a plan and know/understand exactly how to execute that plan before, during and after a cyberattack or data breach. This is a must. Think about it – it can’t be underestimated just how smart cybercriminals really are; it’s all they focus on day in and day out. They are experts at their craft and we must know how to prevent as must as possible and reciprocate, when necessary, to stay safe.

by: Ginger Hill - Wednesday, October 30, 2019

Yesterday’s J.D. Power 2019 Home Security Satisfaction Study that includes both professionally (pro) installed and DIY home security systems got me to thinking about the importance of customer satisfaction as it pertains to the security industry. 

The study, based on responses from 5,289 customers, fielded during July and August of 2019, measured customer satisfaction with home security based on the following: billing and payment; customer service; price; professional monitoring; purchase and installation; and quality of the system. 

In the pro installed category, Brinks Home Security ranked highest in customer satisfaction with a score of 858, followed by ADT, scoring 847. The DIY category ranked Ring Alarm highest, with a score of 904, while SimpliSafe was a close second, with a score of 900. 

Other key findings include: 

  • Desire to upgrade: the most common reason customers in pro and DIY install start shopping for a home security system. Pro install customers were spurred to act by special discounts and bundled packages; DIY install customers are motivated by peace-of-mind and protecting their property. 
  • Brand reputation and pricing: Pro install customers are mostly driven by brand reputation while DIY install customers lean more on price in their decision-making process. 
  • DIY install customers are more satisfied than pro install customers: DIYers are especially satisfied with pricing and are more likely to have additional security-related products beyond control panels, keypads, hubs and alarm sensors, such as video doorbells, exterior cameras and alarm sirens. It is critical to provide pricing options that meet customers’ needs and are easily understood by consumers.

In response to this study, I did some research, and while I think there will always be a part of the population who prefers DIY home security systems, there are three key actions home security professionals can take to retain customers, gain new ones and win-over some of the DIY segment of the industry.

Create extraordinary customer experiences. 

  • Each customer is unique, so it’s necessary to use different tactics to delight them. In other words, consumers want a customized experience. 
  • Treat each as a person, rather than a persona; work hard to understand how each customer feels; and appreciate their needs. 
  • Timeliness matters and most customers expect to find whatever they need — pricing, inventory, etc. — from a company in three clicks or less. To solve complex issues, most consumers expect to speak to one person.
  • Use multiple channels to engage with customers and potential customers including email, in-person, phone, online chat/live support, mobile apps, online portals, online knowledge bases, messenger apps, online forms, social media, text messaging, online communities and voice assistants. 

Be innovative.

  • Embrace and become “the expert” in new technologies so you can show savvy consumers you are up-to-date and teach other consumers who may be behind the curve. (Think artificial intelligence and machine learning). 
  • Connectivity is a major trend in security and offering consumers the opportunity to connect their devices — security systems, smart speakers, fitness trackers, smart thermostats, and more — is key. 

Trust is super important. 

  • Honesty is the best policy when earning customer trust. Through the eyes of a consumer, security, reliability, transparency, ethics and authenticity all equal trust.
  • Make sure strong security controls are in play to protect customer data. 
  • Show consumers that their data is being used legitimately.

 

Here’s a few other resources to help you, the pro installer, increase customer satisfaction: 

 
by: Ginger Hill - Wednesday, October 23, 2019

As the weather cools off here in Texas, I’m heading to the desert — Phoenix, Arizona to be exact, for some (more) sun and warmth, but most importantly to join Resideo at the CONNECT 2019 dealer’s conference. It’s here that I’ll learn all about the connected home – security, HVAC, plumbing and more — and bring all that knowledge to you! Below is a description of all that you can look forward to in the coming days. 

The Partner and Innovation Showcase offers the opportunity to meet with the Resideo team to see their latest technologies in action. On Thursday, Oct. 24, I’ll be tweeting about the latest and greatest connected/smart home technologies offered by Resideo @SSN_Ginger, so be sure you’re following me as well as our hashtag #SSNTalks. 

On Friday, Oct. 25, I’ll bring you tid-bits of information via Twitter from Scott Harkins, VP/GM, Connected Home, Resideo, on how energy, water, air and security provide new opportunities to drive additional revenue and how you can become the smart home hero and expert, presented by Quentin Gunther and Rick Desch, both from Resideo. Also, Bruce Kimbrell of the Disney Institute will be presenting on how to inspire employee engagement through a culture of effective feedback and empowerment.

On Saturday, Oct. 26, I’ll be heading back to Texas, but before I do, Resideo VP/GM, Global Pro Security, Alice DeBiasio will talk about the booming smart home market, forecasted to include approximately 1.3 billion devices by 2022. With the majority of consumers saying they’d choose to have their smart devices installed by a professional versus installing themselves, this is must-have information to create your smart home strategy within your business. This will be followed by how-tos from Jen Tagle of Resideo about selling video alarm verification — how to design, demo and price it to stay ahead of your competitors, create a higher RMR and provide priority police response to your customers. 

Again, be sure to follow me on Twitter @SSN_Ginger as well as Security Systems News’ hashtag #SSNTalks to be the first to see what’s going on at Resideo Connect 2019. 

by: Ginger Hill - Wednesday, October 16, 2019

Cyber Security Awareness Month is in full swing; social media is buzzing with extremely helpful content and resources, mostly of which is free to help businesses and individuals gain and stay in control of their digital worlds. As the saying goes, “you learn something new every day,” or you should. Through social media related to #NCSAM, #cybersecurityawarenessmonth and #BeCyberAware, I heard about a newer way hackers are stealing data – formjacking.

I knew the term “jacking” meant stealing, but combing it with the word “form,” it could mean a variety of things, so I reached out to my friends at the Security Industry Association (SIA) for some guidance. 

“Formjacking is the injection of malicious code into a seemingly trustworthy website form that relays a copy of the field inputs to an attacker,” Joe Gittens, director of standards, SIA, explained. “In these cases, the victim’s transaction with the trust source is not interrupted; however, information from the from, which could include sensitive data, is relayed to the attacker.” 

That literally gave me chills. I can’t speak for you, but I know I have filled out at least hundreds of forms in my digital life; reflecting back over my past 20 years, there’s no telling what data I’ve shared. And, with formjacking, here’s the kicker – there are no red flags for the average online user to look for. 

“Unlike with spoofing and phishing, there are very few tell-tale signs that a form has been compromised,” Min Kyriannis, head, technology business development, Jaros, Baum & Bolles and member of SIA’s Cybersecurity Advisory Board. In fact, the only way to detect formjacking is looking at the code, “and, unless you’re trained, it’s hard to detect,” Gittens said. 

It looks like the regular, every day Joe who is going online and filling out forms has absolutely no way of knowing his data could be at risk, although end users can self-sabotage through installing browser plug-ins, Gittens said. Therefore, it’s mainly up to the company behind the online form to ensure people and their data are protected. 

“Companies need to ensure that all software, plug-ins and any third-party applications or extensions have been vetted and check for vulnerabilities,” Kyriannis advised. “These need to be continuously checked, since software is constantly being updated.” 

It amazes me how smart cybercriminals/hackers truly are, and it’s important to never underestimate them. Think about it in these terms: once a threat is recognized and identified by the “good guys,” the “bad guys” have already moved on “looking for more covert ways to harvest data,” Gittens said, in a way that’s the “easiest to hide and what’s most lucrative” for them,” added Kyriannis.

Gittens identified partner trust as key and noted that formjacking can and has affected large and mom-and-pop institutions. “Just like with other attacks, understanding exactly what type of privileges a third-party service has on your website or your browser and only allowing the most trusted services into your ecosystem can help protect you and your business. Also, be careful about what types of information you are collecting in forms in case you are attacked. If you don’t have to collect sensitive data, don’t do it – contract a trusted third party to perform the transaction for you who has better security protocols in place and can provide you and your customers with assurances. The SIA Cybersecurity Advisory Board will soon look to provide guidance on how security stakeholders can foster more trust within the device and application ecosystem.”

Kyriannis concurs that trust is key, but “people with malicious intent will always find new ways to sneak under the radar. The industry must lead in bringing awareness to their clients, customers, etc., and self-awareness is critical – for end users, that means setting up security parameters for themselves,” such as tagging credit cards to constantly monitor charges. 

Formjacking Key Takeways

  1. Any and all information shared via an online form is at risk of being stolen. 
  2. The only way to detect formjacking is to look at the code. 
  3. Ensure software, plug-ins and any third-party applications or extensions have been vetted and regularly check for vulnerabilities.
  4. Understand the exact privileges a third-party service has on your website/browser. 
  5. If you don’t have to collect sensitive data, don’t. 
  6. Set up security parameters for yourself.
by: Ginger Hill - Wednesday, October 9, 2019

As October presents itself in terms of pumpkin-spiced “everything,” cooler temps, colorful leaves, National Cyber Security Awareness Month (NCSAM) (ICYMI – we are 2019 Champions) and the announcement of SecurityNext’s program, Fall is a whirlwind of excitement! This time of year also reminds me of the extensive travel that takes place to family and friends’ homes for holiday gatherings, industry conferences and other work trips, vacations and the like. And, since the world is so hyper-connected, it is critical and crucial that everyone plans for and takes cybersecurity action when traveling. 

Based on information provided by National Initiative for Cybersecurity Careers and Studies (NICCS), an online resource for cybersecurity training that connects government employees, students, educators and industry with cybersecurity training providers throughout the nation, as well as the Department of Homeland Security, and in honor of our SecurityNext conference, February 9-11, 2020 at the Royal Sonesta in NOLA, and NCSAM, here are some tips to keep yourself, family and friends safe before and during travel:

Before Travel

Update mobile software. Keep the operating system software, web browsers and apps updated will improve your device’s ability to defend against malware. Sign up for and/or turn on automatic updates; set security software to run regular scans; and use anti-virus software.

Back up information. Put contacts, financial data, photos, videos and other mobile data onto another device or external hard drive, or in the cloud. 

Keep devices under lock (and key). Lock your device when you’re not using it; it only takes a few minutes for someone to steal/destroy your data. Set devices to automatically lock after a short time; use strong PINs and passwords. (This is a cool video from HABITU8 for establishing passphrases!) 

Double your login protection. Enable multi-factor authentication (MFA) for email, banking, social media and other services that require logging in. Enable MFA on trusted mobile devices, an authenticator app or a secure token (a small physical device that you can hook onto your key ring, for example.) 

During Travel

No auto-connecting. Disable remote connectivity and Bluetooth to prevent wirelessly connecting automatically to other devices — headphones, automobile infotainment systems, etc. Be choosey when deciding which wireless and Bluetooth networks to connect to. 

Think before connecting. Before connecting to any public wireless hotspot, confirm the network name and exact login procedures with appropriate staff. Your personal hotspot is usually a safer alternative to free Wi-Fi, and only use sites that begin with “https://”.

Play hard to get with strangers. If an email looks “phishy,” do not respond or click on any links or attachments. Use the “junk” or “block” option to no longer receive messages from the sender. 

Never click and tell. Limit the type of information shared on social media and other online places. Keep your full name, address, birthday and vacation plans private, and disable location services. Before posting pictures, make sure there is nothing in it to identify your location such as an address on a building, a street sign, the name of a business, etc. 

Physically guard mobile devices. Never leave devices or components, such as USBs or external hard drives, alone and keep them secured in taxis, at airports, on airplanes and in hotel rooms, lock them up in the commonly provided safe if you don’t want to lug them around with you.

by: Ginger Hill - Wednesday, October 2, 2019

The first thought that popped into my head when hearing about Maureen Carlo, director of strategic alliances – North America at BCDVideo, named as the recipient of this year’s SIA Progress Award: “It couldn’t have happened to a more deserving, humble and truly amazing individual.” 

Carlo and I met my first year in the industry – back in 2010-ish. After an encounter on Twitter and several tweets later, we became fast social media pals. Then, serendipitously, at my second ISC West in a rather obscure hallway, off the beaten path of the show, we found ourselves walking toward each other. Carlo recognized me and said, “Ginger?” And, I literally screamed, “Maureen!” as we gave each other a hug, having met for the first time in person. Since that moment, I have proudly called her my friend. (See how social media can bring people together?) 

It is truly an honor to be writing about Carlo, an industry veteran whose 15-year tenure includes roles at BCDVideo, Videotec Security, NeuEon, Venture Communications & Security and Wells Communication. Through her work in the industry and her seemingly magical way of building strong relationships with others, Carlo has developed an international reputation as a strategic electronic security and integrated systems leader. 

Carlo is dedicated to the advancement of SIA’s mission and serves as committee co-chair of the SIA Women in Security Forum, in which I, too, am a member. (I was so honored when Carlo presented me a membership pin and bag at ISC West at the Women in Security Forum’s breakfast!) Her passion for diversity and inclusivity in the security industry is inspiring, as she helps guide SIA’s efforts in engaging security professionals to promote, recruit and cultivate the leadership of women. 

“Joining SIA offered me the opportunity to connect with the most prestigious leaders in our industry, and together we have created a movement with the Women in Security Forum that is engaging and influencing our integrated security world through diversity and inclusivity,” Carlo said in the announcement. “I am inspired by this award and awed by the honor of receiving the 2019 SIA Progress Award. When we are dedicated to championing others and recognize values, vulnerability, courage and grit as part of the process, our partnerships and participation grow – the effects are force multipliers in bettering our workforce and advancing the next generation of our converged physical and cybersecurity industry.” 

Recent activities in which she helped organize and present lively networking and professional growth include a breakfast at ISC West 2019 and happy hour at GSX 2019; moderator of the ISC West session, “Being a Woman Business Owner in the Security Industry is an Advantage, Not a Disadvantage,” and panelist in the ISC East session, “Strategies for Successful Leadership in the Security Industry.” 

“SIA is thrilled to present the 2019 SIA Progress Award to Maureen Carlo in recognition of her strong dedication to furthering the growth of women in the security industry,” Don Erickson, CEO, SIA said. “Her enthusiastic efforts to elevate women in security through outreach, engagement and leadership have helped to grow the forum and shed light on challenges women face in the industry.” 

SIA’s Progress Award recognizes SIA members who have shown excellence in their advancement of opportunities and success for women in the security industry. Recipients are determined based on their contributions to fostering women in the industry, promotion of women’s professional growth though mentorship and/or sponsorship, recognitions and awards for activities and demonstration of the highest levels of professionalism and integrity in the industry. 

SIA will present Carlo with her award during SIA Honors Night, November 20, in New York City.

 
by: Ginger Hill - Wednesday, September 25, 2019

As the saying goes, “it takes a village,” and nothing is farther from the truth when confronting cybersecurity. It will literally take everyone working together to combat cyber risks and threats. As more and more organizations take the necessary steps to become and stay cyber safe, these same and other organizations are reaching out and showing their support of various campaigns centered around cyber. 

And, now an important announcement … drum roll please!

As of this blog post, Security Systems News is proud to be the only security industry publication recognized as a 2019 Champion Organization of National Cybersecurity Awareness Month (NCSAM) co-led by the National Cyber Security Alliance (NCSA) and the Cybersecurity and infrastructure Agency (CISA) of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. 

In just five days, October will be here, the month of ghouls and goblins, candy and trick-or-treating, and perhaps most importantly, NCSAM, a collaborative effort among businesses, government agencies, colleges and universities, associations, nonprofit organizations and individuals to be committed to this year’s NCSAM overarching team of “Own It. Secure It. Protect It.” This theme serves as encouragement to everyone to #BeCyberSmart through personal accountability and proactive behavior in security best practices and digital privacy.

“Cybersecurity is important to the success of all businesses and organizations,” Kelvin Coleman, executive director, NCSA, said. “NCSA is proud to have such a strong and active community helping to encourage proactive behavior and prioritize cybersecurity in their organizations.” 

So, what does this amazing news mean for you, our amazing readers? Well, throughout the month of October, we will provide you with the latest and greatest tips, discussion topics, free resources, videos, quizzes and more to ensure you are cybersafe!  

To gain access to these must-have tools, be sure to: 

  1. Follow SSN Managing Editor, Ginger Hill, on Twitter @SSN_Ginger; 
  2. If you miss any tweets, search on Twitter using #SSNTalks to see all our previous tweets.
  3. Follow SSN/SecurityNext on LinkedIn; and 
  4. Follow SSN on Facebook

When you see our posts on Twitter, LinkedIn and Facebook, be sure to comment, using #SSNTalks and #BeCyberSmart, like and share! We will respond to all comments! 

Everyone here at SSN is super excited to be a 2019 NCSAM Champion and to join in the fight for cybersecurity!

by: Ginger Hill - Wednesday, September 18, 2019

As a security journalist, I hate to admit that I’m a bit torn on the whole privacy vs. security of video doorbells and whether it’s unethical or not. I mean, I should take a stand, right? Either I support video doorbells or I don’t but, I really do see both sides of this hot debate. 

Here’s an example: My mom lives alone and is a very spry 73-year-old who is quite capable of looking through the peephole of her door to see who’s knocking on it. However, should someone cover her peephole, having a video doorbell, enabling her to see exactly who is at her door before she opens it, and record them, especially if they plan on causing some type of harm, I see is a must. 

But at the same time, let’s say a Girl Scout or Boy Scout rang my mom’s doorbell to sell cookies or popcorn. In my opinion, recording them, or any child for that matter, is very unethical and a huge invasion of privacy, unless, of course, the parents know and give permission. 

To my knowledge there isn’t a video doorbell (yet) that can – with 100 percent accuracy – distinguish between adults who intend to do harmful acts and children. At this point, it just seems video doorbells are an all-or-nothing device that are causing some major disruption.  

A recent ABC news story highlighted attorney, David Barnett, who specializes in privacy law. Barnett suggested letting people know they are under surveillance if using a video doorbell, and take into consideration that these cameras are aimed at property, with the expectation that places such as backyards, windows and bathrooms are private. But, even if the camera is aimed at the front of a home and let’s say children are outside playing in the camera’s recording range, recording them is wrong and what if that camera got hacked? Hackers would then be able to see those children. 

There are also the terms of service of the video doorbell manufacturers that puts a lot of the responsibility on the person installing the device. Ring’s, for example, says, “Privacy and other laws applicable in your jurisdiction may impose certain responsibilities on you and your use of the Products and Services. You agree that it is your responsibility, and not the responsibility of Ring, to ensure that you comply with any applicable laws …” (I’m quite sure people aren’t allowed to point cameras at public streets or into their neighbor’s yards, for example, which if done, can lead to privacy invasion, but where is the responsibility of the manufacturers of these products?)

Then, of course, there’s apps being connected to these video doorbells. Not to pick on Ring, but its new app, Neighbors – where most posts are captured videos – could expose people to a whole new level of privacy invasion, taking the old-school “nosey neighbor” to the extreme. Again, in Ring’s terms of service, it says: “You are solely responsible for all Content that you upload, post, email, transmit or otherwise disseminate using, or in connection with, the Products or Services …” And, again, I ask, shouldn’t the manufacturers of video doorbells take on at least some of the responsibility?

Overall, this topic is a tough one, filled with “ifs, ands and buts,” amazing use cases where lives were saved and the possibility of privacy invasion. This makes me want to subscribe to the old-school method of using the peephole, and if it’s covered, asking “who’s there,” and if there’s no answer, not answering the door. 

What are your thoughts on video doorbells and privacy? Let’s talk about it on Twitter @SSN_Ginger or email me directly at [email protected]

by: Ginger Hill - Wednesday, September 11, 2019

I just completed an article about perimeter school security, “The undogging debacle: perimeter security in a school environment,” in which I had the opportunity to speak with a director of safety and security for a school district, who also has a 14-year background at the local police department, most recently of which was supervisor for the School Resource Officer Unit. He told me something that really opened my eyes and I think that all security professionals involved in the school security niche need to hear. 

Here’s the question I asked: “If you could pick only one security measure that all school environments must have, what would that be and why?” 

The response: “If you limit me to just one security measure, I would have to say it would be hiring the right people, and training them properly in school safety and security,” Mike Johnson, director of safety and security at Rock Hill Schools, said.  

Read that again … limited to ONE security measure, he relies on people, but not just any people, though, trained people, not equipment or services. 

“The people we have in critical places, from administrators and teachers to support staff, are the biggest asset and the strongest point of any safety and security program,” Johnson continued. “Without quality people who are versed in safety and security, we would have nothing.”

Of course, without equipment or services, school security would be impossible in our modern day of school shootings, cyber-attacks, physical breaches, etc.; however, the key to it all is training. Equipment and service users, the people, must be properly trained to use the equipment and services to effectively and efficiently achieve their security goals. Any school could have the latest and greatest security equipment and services deployed, but if it’s not being used properly or even at all, then, really, what’s the point? 

“All the best products in the world are worthless if you don’t have the right people, who are properly trained, using them,” Johnson said. 

So, security professionals, I ask you, “Who is responsible for this training?” I would hope that every security professional, whether an integrator, consultant, sales person, manufacturer, etc., answered with, “I am responsible.” 

I would love to hear your feedback! Please comment here, over on Twitter @SSN_Ginger or email me directly

 

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