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Potter Electric touts new APS

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02/12/2013

ST. LOUIS—Potter Electric Signal has released a new addressable pull station, which stands out because it’s very easy to install and is extremely robust, according to the company, based here.

Security top concern for consumers interested in home automation

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02/11/2013

Sixty-two percent of consumers interested in learning more about home automation said security was their primary motivation, with 67 percent preferring professional installation over do-it-yourself systems when making a purchase, according to new research by the Consumer Electronics Association.

Former Interlogix president joins Guardian Protection

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02/07/2013

WARRENDALE, Pa.—Bob Haskins, former president of Interlogix, will fill a newly created position at Guardian Protection Services, according to a company announcement this week. Haskins’ responsibilities as Guardian’s VP of strategic planning and business development will include helping to expand the company’s dealer program, the announcement said.

SAFE Security acquires 24,000 accounts from Pinnacle

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02/06/2013

SAN RAMON, Calif.—SAFE Security announced this week that it has acquired about 24,000 alarm monitoring accounts from Orem, Utah-based Pinnacle Security. The accounts represent $1.1 million of RMR, according to SAFE, which is based here.

Should you dread a UL audit?

Not if you’ve done your homework and you know what to expect, two specialists tell the CSAA
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02/05/2013

VIENNA, Va.—For central stations pursuing UL certification or expecting their first audit, there can be uncertainty and maybe even a touch of anxiety. It’s an important benchmark—will your facility be able to stand up to the scrutiny?

Deadly shooting follows low-priority alarm in Colorado Springs

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Wednesday, February 6, 2013

It was what the Colorado Springs Police Department calls a Priority Three alarm: A minor incident “requiring a response that is dispatched based on the availability of patrol units.” What followed was the nightmare scenario dreaded by police, alarm companies and alarm users alike.

According to CSPD spokeswoman Barbara Miller, a security alarm was triggered at the home of David Dunlap and Whitney Butler at 11:10 a.m. on Jan. 14. The alarm company, ADT, then called Dunlap’s cellphone and left a message for him to call back. At 11:18, ADT called police to notify them about the alarm.

Based on department policy to reduce the burden of false alarms in the city, officers were not dispatched.

“We had no units available,” Miller told Security Systems News. “We do priority calls. … If there is a ‘crime in progress’ call [with a life-threatening situation], those are first. If it’s a human-activated alarm or a panic alarm, that’s also a high priority. We would respond immediately to that.”

At 11:25, Dunlap returned ADT’s call and was informed about the alarm, but he did not call police, Miller said. Thirty-five minutes later, CSPD responded to a report of shots fired at the couple’s Bassett Drive address. Police say Dunlap and Whitney were killed as they entered their home by 17-year-old Macyo January, who was arrested three days later and charged with first-degree murder.

Miller said the incident calls attention to a common and potentially dangerous oversight by alarm users: If an alarm is activated, they should not assume there will be an immediate response from law enforcement.

“Many times, the alarm company will notify the owner that their house alarm has been activated. If that person returns to his or her home to check on the alarm, they must be extremely cautious and vigilant,” she said. “For instance, if they notice a front door that might be slightly opened or a broken window, or see a suspicious vehicle parked outside their home, we would strongly recommend that they call 911 so an officer can check for a possible burglary in progress or burglary that just occurred.”

Miller said that Colorado Springs police will respond to any activation when there is evidence that a crime has been committed—“i.e., a responsible party is on scene and has told the alarm company there is a broken window at the residence or business. Another example would be an alarm service indicates they have video surveillance inside of the business and they can see someone inside of the location.”

Ron Walters, director of the Security Industry Alarm Coalition, told SSN that virtually all police agencies, even those with scaled-back response policies, handle human-activated alarms “at a fairly high priority.” That goes for video intrusion alarms as well, but as Walters pointed out, there is only so much a security company can do.

“Alarms are designed as a deterrent and cannot stop a crime from happening,” he said. “The best deterrent remains the threat of response by a well-trained and armed police official.”

Pinnacle Security fined more than $500,000

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Monday, February 4, 2013

Summer-model Pinnacle Security is getting a fresh start after traditional-model home security giant Protection 1 recently purchased select assets from the company.

The deal has great potential, according to an alarm company owner who has married both models.

But it appears that problems from Pinnacle’s past continue to dog it. According to news reports, the Utah-based company now has to pay $525,000 as the result of a lawsuit filed by California’s Contra Costa County, charging Pinnacle with deceptive business practices.

It's not the first time Pinnacle has been sued over such issues.

Over the years the company has been accused in a number of states of deceptive sales practices. Last fall, for example, Pinnacle agreed to pay a $1 million fine in a settlement with the state of Illinois for such alleged violations as “slamming” customers and even hiring felons as sales reps.

According to a news report, the following information was released from the office of Contra Costa County District Attorney Mark A. Peterson. It said that the civil judgment against Pinnacle, in addition to the payment of penalties and costs:

 

o    Requires Pinnacle’s sales representatives to refrain from making false and misleading statements during the door- to-door sales presentations.
o    Prohibits Pinnacle sales representatives from telling consumers that they will get free or discounted products or services if they allow a Pinnacle sign to be placed in their yard.
o    Prohibits Pinnacle sales representatives from telling consumers that sales representatives are engaging in “seed marketing, advertising, marketing, or increasing Pinnacle’s visibility in the neighborhood”.
o    Requires that Pinnacle sales representatives comply with section 17500.3 of the Business and Professions Code by immediately verbally identifying themselves, who they work for, and what they are selling.
o    Requires that Pinnacle use contracts that comply with California’s Unruh Act and federal regulation Z pertaining to retail installment contracts by disclosing, among other things, the total price of the alarm monitoring service for the initial contract term of years.
o    Requires that Pinnacle use Spanish language contracts for customers to whom the sales presentation was made primarily in Spanish.
o    Requires that whenever a sale is made to a customer who already has monitoring equipment installed by another monitoring service provider, that Pinnacle shall not remove that customer’s existing monitoring equipment until such time as the three-day cancellation period (applicable to door-to-door residential sales) has expired.
o    Puts limits on the amount of contract termination fees that can be charged to customers.
o    Requires the payment of restitution to certain customers; and
o    Requires that Pinnacle adopt specified provisions to monitor the future conduct of their sales representatives.

 

Telguard communicator meets 2013 NFPA 72 requirements

Does the new sole-path communications requirement mean more opportunities for dealers?
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02/04/2013

CHICAGO—Telular Corp. recently announced that its Telguard TG-7FS cellular communicator is now compliant with the National Fire Protection Association 2013 edition requirements for sole-path communications. The latest edition of NFPA 72, the National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code, allows sole-path cellular communications to be supervised for commercial fire systems once every 60 minutes, instead of every five minutes as required by the 2010 edition, the company said.

ASAP getting closer to reaching ‘critical mass’

Central stations stepping up to speed alarm notifications to PSAPs
 - 
02/01/2013

YARMOUTH, Maine—After big strides in 2012 that put an array of technical and logistical challenges behind it, the Automated Secure Alarm Protocol is getting closer to reaching “critical mass” nationwide, according to ASAP proponent Ed Bonifas.

Hot button: Who’s getting into mobile PERS now?

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Wednesday, January 30, 2013

The world of mobile PERS and remote health monitoring continues to expand.

At the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas earlier this month, ADT announced that it was getting into the game by teaming with Ideal Life, a Toronto-based company whose health monitoring and information technology will be integrated with ADT Pulse to provide “proactive prevention” for people managing chronic health conditions. The system uses digital, wireless, secure two-way communicators to measure and relay information about glucose levels, blood pressure, body weight, oxygen saturation and heart rate.

Royal Philips Electronics, which has long been a player in personal emergency response systems, also made news at CES by introducing Lifeline GoSafe. The mobile PERS system combines the company’s AutoAlert fall-detection capability with two-way cell communication and up to seven user-location technologies.

“Our intention is that GoSafe will provide users with the confidence to get back to activities or go to places they have scaled back on, knowing that help is easily accessible,” Rob Goudswaard, senior director of product and service programs for Philips Home Monitoring, said in a prepared statement.

The need to provide more protection for seniors as they maintain their independence isn’t lost on Mace Security International, which is “looking hard” at getting into the mobile PERS space, CEO and President John McCann told SSN last week.

“I think you’re going to see a shift from just home security to security 24/7,” McCann said. “As you look at that shift in the world, and I use my dear sweet mother as an example, I’m a little more worried when she’s on the road than when she’s at home. Therefore we’re looking at how do we increase that fence around her so she’s safe, so loved ones feel that the person they’re worried about is safe.”

Security dealers who want to take advantage of this growing market might want to think about attending the second annual PERS Summit, which will be held Sept. 10-12 in Park City, Utah. Last year’s inaugural session brought together more than 100 dealers, service providers and manufacturers’ reps for three days of networking. To learn more, go to www.perssummit.com.

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