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Artificial Intelligence (AI) necessary to respond to cyberattacks

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Wednesday, July 24, 2019

Being born in the late 70s, it’s been amazing to watch the evolution of computers, the Internet, cyber and the like. I remember sitting in my junior high computer class—7th grade, I believe. Working with Basic on an Apple 2e, I created white coding on a black screen that made a man (stick figure) jump, dance and run when the user got the correct answer to the math problem presented on the screen. That, my friends, was high tech! 

Now, the graphics are realistic and some even interact with voice; data is being produced and shared at the rate of zettabytes; and computers are turning into machine learners, all of which is absolutely amazing but at the same time scary as bad people have turned it into a free-for-all of mass hacking that is detrimental to people and society. 

Human security experts work tirelessly each and every day to keep people like you and me, and the world safe; however, being human, they have their limits. For example, cybersecurity involves repetitiveness and tediousness, scouring through big data to identify anomalous data points; long, exhausting hours of data analysis; and relentlessly monitoring data going in and out of enterprise networks. Enter the age of artificial intelligence (AI) penetrating into the cyber realm in terms of security, obviously known collectively as cybersecurity. Working along-side humans, AI can complement cybersecurity by performing the repetitive, tedious tasks; it can be trained to take predefined steps against attacks and learn the most ideal responses going forward; and AI is fast and accurate with data analysis. This enables and empowers human security experts to use their talents and skills on other projects to further enhance cybersecurity. 

Capgemini, a global leader in consulting, technology services and digital transformation, recently published “Reinventing Cybersecurity with Artificial Intelligence Report,” finding 61 percent of enterprises said they cannot detect breach attempts today without the use of AI technologies. That’s over half of the 850 senior executives surveyed from IT information security, cybersecurity and IT operations in seven sectors across 10 countries. And if that’s not eye-opening enough, check out these findings: 

  • 69 percent believe AI will be necessary to respond to cyberattacks; 
  • 73 percent are testing AI use cases for cybersecurity; 
  • 64 percent said AI lowers the cost and reduces overall time taken to detect and respond to breaches by 12 percent; and
  • 56 percent said their cybersecurity analysts are overwhelmed and approximately 23 percent are not able to successfully investigate all identified incidents. 

With numbers like these, it’s easy to see AI and machine learning are essential to cybersecurity now and into the future. So, here at SSN, we’ve taken a huge step to bring you the latest and greats cybersecurity news with the addition of a “cybersecurity” tab on our website. Yep, that’s right … a whole section dedicated to all things cybersecurity!

To get a taste of our cybersecurity content check out the articles “Federal government aims to modernize physical security practices” and “Data forensics: time is of the essence,” and as always, we value your feedback. 

 

 

Data forensics: time is of the essence

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07/03/2019

AUSTIN, Texas—Huge volumes — think terabytes, petabytes, exabytes, zettabytes, yottabytes and up into the quintillion bytes — of complex, digital data is constantly being generated and scattered into different physical and virtual locations such as online social networks, the cloud and personal network-attached storage units.

New technology arrives to the security industry

HELIAUS by Allied Universal, an advanced AI-driven workforce management technology for security pros
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06/28/2019

SANTA ANA, Calif.—Modern society owes quite a bit of gratitude to the Ancient Greeks, whose inventions and discoveries are still used today — the alarm clock, automatic doors, Olympics, modern philosophy and more.

Vintra integrates AI-powered video analytics with Genetec’s Security Center platform

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05/23/2019

SAN JOSE, Calif.—Vintra, maker of video analytics powered by machine learning and artificial intelligence, announced their proprietary FulcrumAI deep learning video analytics solution is integrated with Genetec Security Center to deliver real-time, total-environment intelligence from any camera source, fixed or mobile.

Open Security & Safety Alliance membership doubles; open platform initiatives surge forward

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05/07/2019

SAN RAMON, Calif.—In the Fall of 2018, five companies — Bosch Building Technologies, Hanwha Techwin, Milestone Systems, Pelco by Schneider Electric and VIVOTEK, Inc. — came together for the good of the open platform community, becoming founding companies of the Open Security & Safety Alliance (OSSA), or simply, “the Alliance.”

Synectics and AnyVision launch promising partnership

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05/06/2019

MANCHESTER, England—Synectics has established an integration partnership with AnyVision, a pioneer in AI-based facial, body and object recognition that allows Synectics’ systems users to incorporate facial recognition data within the Synergy 3 command and control platform, leveraging site-wide, sub-systems data via intelligent automation capabilities.

IntelliVision introduces video analytics for Ambarella CV22 SoC

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05/06/2019

SAN JOSE, Calif.—IntelliVision Technologies Corp., creator of artificial intelligence (AI) and deep learning video and audio analytics software for Smart Cameras and a subsidiary of Nortek Security & Control, LLC, recently introduced video analytics for the Ambarella CV22 IP Camera SoC, based on new CVflow architecture that includes hardware support for deep neural networks.

Look for SIA’s ‘Top 8’ technology advancements on the ISC West showroom floor

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Wednesday, March 27, 2019

Times are exciting and abuzz here at Security Systems News, with thoughts of ISC West and preparation taking place for booth visits, video interviews, happy hours and dinners, and connecting/reconnecting with industry professionals to learn about new trends and offerings available for security. Personally, I enjoy talking about industry trends, new technologies and where people predict the industry to be heading in the future. It’s quite fascinating when you stop to think about just 10 years ago and how far the security industry has come since. 

The Security Industry Association (SIA) shared the top eight technological advancements the organization feels is most significantly impacting physical and cybersecurity and public safety. Here’s what to look for on the showroom floor: 

  1. Cloud – Video surveillance as a service (VSaaS), specifically recording, storage, management, analytics and monitoring solutions in the cloud, especially residential video with low camera counts, according to Joseph Gittens, director of standards, SIA, via ISC West’s website.
  2. Artificial Intelligence (AI) – analytics applications for automated motion and trespassing detection, advanced algorithms performing identification and categorization within scenes and systems, and leveraging data from multiple sensors to help reduce false alarms and enhance home automation. 
  3. Robotics/autonomous systems – improvements in robotics and drones around AI, power storage and mobility, in which many companies are allowing users to pay for services provided by these security solutions.
  4. Mobile credentials – SIA predicts the public will become comfortable using these credentials to complete transactions other than access control. In turn, more commercial security installations should be seen along with systems migrating into unified systems that grant and manage access. 
  5. Security audio – specialized solutions that monitor and apply analytics to audio. Audio can also be a lucrative value add-on to video security systems. 
  6. Facial biometrics – look for solutions that provide acute verification accuracy and more affordability with these solution offerings.
  7. 5G LTE – glimpses of mobile video security solutions with public safety and smart cities applications. 
  8. Voice control – new home security and home automation products with existing or “coming soon” integration with voice control/smart speaker providers.

Let’s go on a treasure hunt at ISC West 2019! When you see one of these technologies in action on the showroom floor, take a picture or short video and tweet it to our hashtag #SSNTalks and tag our editors @SSN_Editor and @SSN_Ginger! 

AI coming to the aid of security-related applications

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Wednesday, March 20, 2019

Our May 2019 News Poll got me really thinking about Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning (ML), and the possibilities. My previous AI-related thoughts have been around Watson, the IBM-created, question-answering computer system that answers in natural language, and robots, and how AI can take over the world one day, according to some! Spooky! But, I wanted to know if AI is a legit, practical application for security-related functions, so I scoured the internet and found some exciting and unique, currently deployed uses. 

Physical Security

According the to China Morning Post, AI is revolutionizing physical security in Asia. It can detect people acting out of the ordinary and flag them, and then transmit that information to a command center, where human operators can make an informed decision. Additionally, AI and high-definition cameras can work together to first communicate to a human that a smoke detector, for example, has been activated, with the cameras identifying the exact location of the fire. 

Financial Security

Shoplifting literally costs billions of dollars here in the United States, which trickles down to honest consumers who end up paying more for goods and services. Vaak, a Tokyo-based company, spent more than 100 hours showing their AI system closed-circuit television footage of honest shoppers and shoplifters. The system can now identify suspicious activity based on more than 100 aspects of shoppers’ behavior including gait, hand movements, facial expressions, clothing choices and even “restless” and “sneaking” behaviors. Store employees are alerted of suspiciousness via an app and they can decide what to do. 

Life Security

Paris-based startup, Pharnext, was founded by Daniel Cohen, who “mapped” the human genome and demonstrated it is possible to use Big Data and automation to speed up the processing of DNA samples. Today, Cohen is using AI to analyze and map the chain of reactions of disease in the body. With this information, he and his team are combining existing drugs, known as “repurposing,” to create therapeutic effects that each drug lacks on its own. His overall goal is to use existing medicines to treat all disease, preventing the design of new medicines. 

Cybersecurity

Post-doctoral research fellow at Stanford University, Dr. Srijan Kuman, is developing an AI method — REV2 — to identify online conflict using data and machine learning to predict internet trolling before it happens. (Trolling is an action by a person who posts inflammatory and often deceptive and disinformation online to provoke others to respond on pure emotion.) Kuman uses statistical analysis, graph mining, embedding and deep learning to determine normal and malicious behaviors. His method is currently being used by Flipkart, an online store, to identify fake reviews and reviewers, and he was able to accurately predict when one Reddit community will troll another. 

Be sure to check out our editor’s blog that talks about worldwide spending on AI systems to reach $35.8 billion in 2019, according to International Data Corporation. 

 

AI within security: Is it fully realized yet?

The capabilities of AI have increased exponentially in the last few years, and government and industry alike are taking notice. What does this mean for the security industry?
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02/28/2019

WASHINGTON—Back in early 2017, an unlikely leader emerged in the global artificial intelligence enterprise: Canada.