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home automation

Home automation company goes public

Wednesday, August 7, 2013

Home automation provider Control4 had a successful IPO on Friday Aug. 2. The company offered 4,000,000 shares of its common stock for $16 per share. The shares began trading on the NASDAQ market.

The share price quickly climbed to $20.70 in what Business Insider called a “stellar IPO. … That gives the 10-year-old, Salt Lake City, Utah, company a valuation of about $446 million. Not bad considering it had 2012 revenues of $109.5 million and posted a loss from operations every year since 2008.”

The stock closed at $21.06 on Tuesday, Aug. 6.

One winner in the deal, Business Insider pointed out, is Cisco, which made an undisclosed $20 million investment in the company in 2011.

Business insider says that Cisco “also signed on to sell a Cisco-branded version of its products and to help Control4 develop new products. … Control4 is part of Cisco's big vision of a brand new tech market called the Internet of Things (although Cisco prefers the term the Internet of Everything). IoT refers to putting all the inanimate objects in your home, office and city on the Internet and making them interactive."

And speaking of the Internet of Things, we had a great panel discussion at TechSec last year about that touched on that topic, and we’ll be doing more on it this year. We’re putting the program together right now. Look for details around ASIS time.


Cox expanding its home security/home automation reach

By the end of 2012, the cable company plans to offer Cox Home Security in seven states

ATLANTA—After a successful trial of its home security/home automation offering in Arizona, Cox Communications is now expanding Cox Home Security to six other states.

Advanced XANDEM taking orders

Wednesday, November 11, 2015

XANDEM HOME in Salt Lake City is launching its new DIY home security and automation product that tracks the location of moving people.

The product, which can be installed by homeowners in about 15 minutes, the company says, allows users to monitor where people are moving throughout their homes without using invasive cameras. Think of the safeguarding lasers of the “Mission Impossible” movies, because that’s what it looks like.

The product detects and locates movement through walls and furniture to cover the entire house; integrates with other smart-home systems such as lighting and audio; triggers a siren to scare intruders away and sends mobile app notifications; and includes an API so developers can use the company’s Detect and Locate technology in their own apps and products.

XANDEM, started in a basement in 2008, has been selling in prototype form, but has made advancements such as the phone app and so forth, Joey Wilson, company founder and CEO, told Security Systems News.

“We’re taking orders for XANDEM HOME via Indiegogo soon,” he said. 

The company recently received grants from DHS and the National Science Foundation.

“What we’re seeing is that it used to be if you wanted a security system in your home, you could go to a custom professional or get a rinky dink local package and they could slap it down,” Wilson said. “But now … DIY and MIY are growing rapidly.

“We’re very connected to the IofT. We are not an alarm company. We’re an amazing technology company, not even a security company. We’re like Nest or Dropcam. You can put this in yourself or have an integrator put it in,” Wilson said.

He added that he’s seen a lot of interest from integrators.


Good news for dealers: Consumers still disappointed with DIY cameras

Satisfaction with other smart home devices slowly rising, Argus Insights says

LOS GATOS, Calif.—Consumers’ disappointment with DIY home security cameras could become a “renaissance” for traditional dealers, according to John Feland, CEO of Argus Insights. Customers need some help, he said, and dealers are positioned to do just that.

White Rabbit receives patent

System’s ‘User Awareness’ function recognizes customers

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo.—White Rabbit Electronics, the home automation company recently formed by Bold Technology execs, patented  part of its smart home platform—the system’s “User Awareness.” 

Home automation should be smart, but simple


YARMOUTH, Maine—Home automation experts have heard the message loud and clear: simplify, simplify, simplify.

It’s all about the Millennials

Wednesday, July 1, 2015

It’s the Millennials who are the biggest DIY buyers, according to ESX 2015 panelists at a “DIY Security—Competition or Opportunity” discussion. 

Icontrol’s 2015 State of the Smart Home Report, a nationwide survey which Security System News conducted and has reported on earlier, also found that the Millennial generation, loosely defined as those born in the early 1980s to the early 2000s, are big consumers of home automation. You can read more about the survey at the above link, but here a few new tidbits from it from its recent official release.

The report said, “U.S. consumers aged 25-34 express a higher level of excitement around the following benefits of the smart home:

  • Greater productivity and ability to manage work-life balance, 40 percent vs. 23 percent of consumers overall.
  • Making it easier to enjoy music, movies and web surfing anywhere in the house, 26 percent vs. 18 percent.
  • Helping anticipate the needs, such as shopping lists and minor repairs, 24 percent vs. 18 percent.
  • More interactive features that help me connect with the people in my life, 21 percent vs. 13 percent.”

Entertainment has emerged as a smart home driver, icontrol found. Interest in the entertainment link has grown to 55 percent since last year’s report. Consumers want their entertainment rooms connected to their smart home, followed by their kitchens and bedrooms. 

A challenge is getting that younger generation to move from DIY to traditional security providers, according to Brian Leland of Interlogix and Sterling Barnes of Melaleuca Security, the panelists at the ESX discussion. You'll be able to read more about the ESX DIY panel later, so stay tuned, please. 

The icontrol report had some other great factoids as well, so stay tuned for more info on that as well. 

Consumers ‘ho-hum’ about home automation?

Study says demand is down, products must become easier to use

LOS GATOS, Calif.—Advances in connected home technology were all the buzz at ISC West 2015, and recent studies point to a boom, too, but an alternative report from Argus Insights suggests that the big buzz is overrated. The market is stalling and may even be shrinking, it says.

Survey: Dealers cite cost as barrier to adding home automation

That’s a misperception, says Icontrol’s Greg Roberts

REDWOOD CITY, Calif.—A majority of residential security dealers thinks adding home automation services to their traditional offerings is cost prohibitive. That’s a big misperception, according to Greg Roberts, VP of marketing for Icontrol, and one that could put providers at a significant disadvantage in today’s marketplace.

NewsPoll: SSN readers debate the utility of CES home automation gadgets

Should toasters text? Fourteen percent call it a good idea

YARMOUTH, Maine—Home automation gadgets coming out of the 2015 Consumer Electronics Show are interesting, but discretion might be needed before some go too far, according to Security Systems News readers responding to our latest NewsPoll.