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California Alarm Association

Alarm industry mourns Michael Kallio of Mace CS

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Wednesday, January 16, 2013

Mace Central Station announced late Tuesday that Michael Kallio, the company’s vice president of business development, died Jan. 10 after a battle with cancer.

Kallio was a 26-year employee of Mace CS in Anaheim, Calif., and was a member of the California Alarm Association.

“Michael was a dedicated, loyal manager and he helped guide the company to be one of the most respected central stations in California and the West,” said Michael Joseph, vice president and general manager of Mace CS, in a prepared statement.

Mace Security International announced that it will create the Michael Kallio Spirit Award and will provide matching funds for a scholarship endowment in his honor. The endowment will help deserving students with their college educations.

Kallio was promoted to vice president of business development at Mace CS in April 2012. Previously, he was manager of business development and operations manager. He was also a real estate agent at Joshua Realty & Loan in Orange County, according to his LinkedIn profile.

AT&T’s 2G shutdown in Oakland false alarm for industry

Frequency blackout didn’t affect alarm companies, CAA says
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09/05/2012

OAKLAND, Calif.—AT&T’s move to partially disable its 2G service here at the end of August got the attention of California Alarm Association members, but the frequency blackout did not affect operations in the field, according to CAA Executive Director Jerry Lenander.

Prevent CO poisoning: Alarm companies should help Californians help themselves

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Wednesday, July 25, 2012

It’s now more than a year since California’s new law mandating carbon monoxide detectors in all single-family homes with an attached garage or fossil fuel source. However, a new survey shows many residents remain unprotected.

Seems to me there’s a marketing opportunity here that alarm companies would do well to take advantage of—to not only help themselves but also California residents.

It’s true that the new law, which took effect July 1, 2011, doesn’t require Californians to opt for monitored alarms instead of ones they can buy at the hardware store. But in a story I wrote last summer, John Hopper, president of the California Alarm Association, said he believes many residents will chose the monitored option as the safest.

“The state law has positioned us to perhaps increase revenues for the industry, from sales of the devices and associated monitoring,” he told me then.

A year later, perhaps this new survey will provide added impetus for residents and alarm companies.

Below is more from a recent news release on the survey, which was done on behalf of Kidde, a manufacturer of residential fire safety products, and the California Safe Homes Coalition. Kidde is a part of UTC Climate, Controls & Security, a unit of United Technologies Corp.
 

While more than half of Californians are aware of a law requiring residential carbon monoxide (CO) alarms, many residents remain unprotected, according to a survey from independent research group, Qualtrics. Nearly half (46 percent) of respondents do not have a CO alarm in their home despite the overwhelming presence of both fuel-burning appliances (84 percent) and attached garages (75 percent) – the state-determined criteria for installation and primary risk factors for accidental CO poisoning.
 
The results come on the eve of the law’s one-year anniversary on July 1. Nearly half of respondents without a CO alarm stated they know they need one, but haven’t found the time to install the life-saving device. Another one-third of respondents believe that they do not need an alarm even though it is the only safe way to detect CO, an odorless, tasteless and invisible gas.

“We are encouraged that many California residents have heard our message, understand the dangers of CO poisoning and have installed an alarm,” explained Kevin Nida, president, California State Firefighters’ Association (CSFA), a supporter of the California Safe Homes Coalition and co-sponsor of State Bill 183. “However, we urge those who have not yet acted to do so now. Carbon monoxide is perceived as an issue that only impacts cold-weather states, and that’s not a safe assumption. We’ve experienced the tragedy of CO poisonings here in California all too often.”
 
Called the ‘silent killer’ because many people do not realize they’re being poisoned until it’s too late, carbon monoxide is the leading cause of accidental poisoning deaths according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). It claims 400 lives and injures another 20,000 each year nationwide. California officials estimate CO poisoning causes 700 avoidable injuries and hospitalizations annually.
 
“I miss my sister every day. Unfortunately, no one in my family knew about CO poisoning until it was too late,” said Walnut, Calif. resident Ta Juan Campbell.  His sister, Tyra Lynn, died of accidental CO poisoning in her Beverly Hills apartment in 1998. Campbell founded the Tyra Lynn Foundation to raise awareness of CO poisoning.  “If you’ve put off installing a CO alarm, don’t wait. It could save your family.”
 
California’s law aims to protect families, while reducing the number of associated casualties.  A final phase requiring CO alarms in existing multi-family residential dwellings goes into effect Jan. 1, 2013.

 

Meeting targets non-response in San Jose

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Friday, January 27, 2012

The alarm industry was caught off guard at the end of December when the San Jose (Calif.) Police Department implemented a non-response policy for unverified alarms. Now the California Alarm Association is regrouping and is rallying members to discuss what comes next.

To that end, the Silicon Valley Alarm Association, a CAA affiliate, will be holding a lunch meeting next week, with the San Jose situation at the top of the agenda. The meeting is scheduled for 11:30 a.m. Wednesday, Feb. 1, at the Silicon Valley Capital Club in San Jose. Anyone interested in attending is asked to RSVP by calling 800-437-7658, Ext. 3, or by emailing the SVAA/CAA office at info@caaonline.org.

Sharon Elder, a police liaison for the Orange County Alarm Association, told SSN earlier this month that San Jose's new policy is similar to one adopted in Dallas several years ago. Dallas' policy has since been repealed because "it just doesn't provide good policing," she said.

Industry officials are hoping San Jose comes to the same conclusion. Concerned alarm company owners and city residents can learn the latest at Wednesday's session.

Bay Alarm exec on state board overseeing alarm companies

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Monday, January 9, 2012

I’ve written about Pacheco, Calif.-based Bay Alarm before. The company, which is more than 65 years old, says it’s the largest independently-owned and operated alarm company in the nation. It’s certainly a competitive player in California, and now the company’s co-president has been appointed by that state’s governor to an important committee that oversees alarm companies in the state.

Here’s more from the news release Bay Alarm sent out early this month:

In one of his final appointments of 2011, California Governor Edmund G. "Jerry" Brown Jr. named Matthew Westphal to the Alarm Company Operator Disciplinary Review Committee (DRC), part of the Department of Consumer Affairs, on Friday, December 30.

Westphal, co-president of Bay Alarm Company, the largest independently-owned and operated alarm company in the United States, has been a board member of the Security Network of America since 2001 and the California Alarm Association since 2000, where he served as president from 2009 to 2010.

"Because of my in-depth knowledge of the industry, and the California Code of Regulations, I feel well equipped to help steward this important Consumer Affairs Committee through the years ahead," Westphal said. "I am honored to serve on the DRC, and look forward to sharing my ideas and expertise."

The five members of the Alarm Company Operator DRC are appointed by the Governor of California and include three alarm company operators and two members of the public. The committee reviews appeals of fines against alarm company operators or their employees, and denial, revocation, or suspension of licenses, certificates, registrations or permits issued by the Bureau of Security and Investigative Services.

San Jose's non-response policy catches alarm industry off guard

Holiday 'surprise' has companies and owners assessing potential costs
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01/04/2012

SAN JOSE, Calif.—The police department’s new non-response policy for unverified alarms, announced the week before Christmas and put into effect Jan. 1, ignores data on enhanced call verification and rolls out a “welcome mat” for burglars, alarm industry officials say.

New CO law business, learning opportunity

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08/11/2011

MARINA DEL REY, Calif.—California recently became the 35th state in the nation with carbon monoxide legislation. As of July 1, all existing single-family homes with an attached garage or a fossil fuel source are required to install CO alarms within the home. Previous legislation already mandated the detectors in new homes.
The law is a way for the industry both to increase business and its knowledge and expertise regarding the devices, according to John Hopper, president of the California Alarm Association, which is based here.