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Tyco adjusts guidance for Fire & Security segment, shareholders approve of spinoffs

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09/17/2012

SCHAFFHAUSEN, Switzerland – Tyco, announced today that shareholders have approved the spinoffs of ADT and Flow Control International.

ASIS 2012, Pro 1 buys again, mobility and the financial vertical

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Wednesday, September 12, 2012

It’s been a busy two days for Amy Canfield (the new lead editor for our sister publication Security Director News) and I here in Philly at the ASIS show.

Since Sept. 10, the first day of ASIS, was Amy’s fifth day on the job, she accompanied me to most of my appointments that day. She did have a chance to speak to a group of end users at the Honeywell booth. Here’s her update on that  and she was flying solo on Day 2--check out her blog  for highlights of her day, including a tour of the security operation of the Philadelphia Convention Center with integrator Schneider Electric.

Here are some highlights from my conversations on the show floor on Day 1 and Day 2. Check back tomorrow for Day 3.

DIEBOLD
At the Diebold booth I met with Tony Byerly, who’d just completed his first 90 days as head of security at Diebold, along with Diebold IT chief Jeremy Brecher and Felix Gonzalez, who earlier this summer left Stanley to join Byerly’s senior staff as the newly appointed VP for strategic initiatives and business development in electronic.security.

Diebold was the first of several integrators I spoke to who said that one focus for them will be the financial services vertical. It’s not a surprise for Diebold, who's parent company is the largest ATM provider.

Byerly touted Diebold’s long history, the company’s reputation for steady, high quality service and technology know-how as advantages in the marketplace. He also noted the shifting competitive landscape and said Diebold stands out for a variety of reasons including the fact that “we’re a strategic in the space—we’re not backed by private equity.” He called Diebold the “nation’s only pure-play integrator,” pointing out that “we don’t have an adjacent manufacturing arm.”

Brecher talked about being “in the value position” with service and technology. “We invest time and resources to create solutions instead of packaging solutions,” he said. Diebold works to leverage a customer’s existing infrastructure, and customers have a “single method to connect to Diebold … a single customer portal … the entire web experience is easy to manage.”  
 
PROTECTION 1
Protection 1 had some big news. Click here to see the story about a big acquisition Pro 1 made. It’s a systems integrator with staff that's experienced and certified to work on networks. With the new staff/capabilities, Jamie Haenggi told me, Pro 1 will be taking on jobs it would have walked away from in the past.

STANLEY CSS
Stanley announced that John Nemerofsky is the new VP of Global Solutions, and that there's a new phalanx of vertical market leaders. There’s other news as well. Stanley is bringing together three business units: the CSS team, the Mechanical Solutions team, and the Security and Automatic Door team.

The teams would work together in the past, but it “would happen more through accident,” Nemerovsky told me. Now, there’s a “process where we’ll work together to pull together the best possible solution for the client.”

And there are specific solutions for each vertical market. This infrastructure will be appreciated by global accounts customers who “are looking for consistency in deliverables … the same deliverables, billing, systems they have in Chile [for example], that they have in New York City, Barcelona, Tokyo and Paris.”

Here’s the list of vertical market leaders: Paul Retzbach – Commercial Leader, Government; Chris Hobbs– Commercial Leader, Retail; Tom Benson – Commercial Leader, Banking; Paul Baratta–Commercial Leader, Healthcare; Rebecca Durham–Commercial Leader, K-12 Education; Eric Rittenhouse–Commercial Leader, Higher Education; Jerry Walker–Global Strategic Account and SSS Solutions; Eddie Meltzer–Global Strategic Accounts and SSS Solutions; Bob Stockwell–Technology Leader; Lance Holloway–Technology Leader; Beth Tarnoff–Marketing Leader; Ryan Fritts–Vertical eServices Leader

Look for more on this story next week.

TYCO
I also spoke with Renae Leary, senior director of global accounts for Tyco. Click here to read that story.

JOHNSON CONTROLS
I spoke to Tammee Thompson at Johnson Controls, who told me that ASIS is the show where she and others "take a break from making the quarter" (but only briefly she emphasized) to check out technology. She had an army of employees out scouring the floor “looking for the latest and greatest to pull into our technology stack.” Specifically, JCI is looking for access control solutions, VMS, PSIM and ID management solutions.

RED HAWK
I also had a chance to chat with Mike Snyder of Red Hawk. He said that the company is finishing up “moving the infrastructure [network and IT systems] out of UTC,” and officially began its rebranding as Red Hawk in the past couple of weeks.

Snyder also talked about focusing on the financial vertical market, saying that the next wave of retail banking will not be branch operations, but ATMs. He believes Red Hawk will have a leg up on the competition because his staff has deep experience in the financial sector, some originally coming from Mosler. The company also has a partnership with ATM provider NCR.

AXIS COMMUNICATIONS
At this show, Axis Communications was showing many new products and solutions, many targeted toward the fewer-than-16 channel market. (Look for a story next week about a visit I made to Axis H.Q in Massachusetts a couple of weeks ago.) When I asked Fredrik Nilsson about all the talk I was hearing about the financial vertical, he noted that Axis had an ATM with four cameras in its booth. Nilsson said that banking is a conservative vertical that is finally making the leap from analog to IP. “Education was the first, then retail, and now it’s banking’s turn.”

He agreed with Snyder’s point that the new wave of retail banking is moving from the branch to ATMs. "When was the last time you went into a bank branch?," he asked. "I refinanced my house online."

Coincidentally, Axis is also in the process of hiring a business development specialist for the financial vertical, he said.

AVIGILON
At the Avigilon press conference, the company introduced the new version of its software. Keith Maret said Avigilon took inspiration from Google, Apple and Facebook in the development of this software. The cool thing is that the software can respond to voice commands and body movements. COO Andrew Martz demoed this capability and it was like watching a command center staffer play squash on a Nintendo Wii. The command center screens zoomed and focused in response to voice commands and hand gestures. This feature is in the alpha phase. “We’re gauging the interest in it,” he said.

Maret summarized the features thus: crash-proof enterprise server management, where all servers are grouped together; a “collaborative mode” where more than one person can log into video feed and manipulate the video in real time; and intelligent virtual matrix that “allows you to turn video walls to life.”

HONEYWELL

At Honeywell, in addition to talking to the end user committee, I spoke with Scott Harkins about Honeywell’s emphasis on the “connected business," where the access, video and intrusion systems are tied into other systems such as: HR systems, radars [in super high-end port applications] POS for example. The emphasis of course, as we heard from nearly every manufacturer at the show, is on mobility. Honeywell’s newest ProWatch 4.0 access control has a new mobile offering that enables remote access from iPads,  phones and other devices. It’s also integrated with wireless locks, something Harkins is very excited about, because it’s so much cheaper to install, maintain and manage.

FOOTBALL

The traffic on Day 1 was the lightest I’ve seen in a while at an ASIS show. It picked up considerably on Day 2, but it was still moderate traffic to my eye.

Why? Well, there’s the economy of course. Things may be looking up, but one manufacturer told me that people who’ve got money in the bank are keeping it there. They’re still cutting corners on travel—making this a one- or two-day show, rather than three.

I also heard that having the show in Philly meant that tri-staters could take the train in for Day 2 and 3.

And, I understand there may have been some football-related reasons that folks weren’t here on Monday.

Football.

I can think of about 80 things I’d rather do [including laundry] than watch football on a gorgeous fall day, but if football will help roll back the expectation that people should travel to work events on Sundays, count me in.

Go Pats. Woo.
 

OV, Vivotek reach agreement

ITC trial involving Bosch, Samsung set for this week
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07/16/2012

RESTON, Va.—Video analytics provider Object Video announced in June that it has signed a patent licensing agreement with Vivotek. Meanwhile, its patent battle with major video surveillance providers Samsung and Bosch will continue, with an International Trade Commission trial scheduled to begin this week.

SimplexGrinnell: ‘Our business will thrive’ with Tyco split

Reorganization will allow SimplexGrinnell to focus on life safety
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06/22/2012

LAS VEGAS—At the National Fire Protection Association’s annual Conference & Expo, held here in June, SimplexGrinnell President Bob Chauvin said Tyco International’s pending split into three publicly traded companies on Oct. 1 will benefit SimplexGrinnell.

AT&T enters security market, but can it become a billion-dollar business?

One way to build scale would be to acquire the largest player
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05/09/2012

DALLAS—When AT&T announced on Monday that it will begin trials this summer of Digital Life, its home security/home automation service, here and in Atlanta, mainstream newspapers reported that the company was looking to potentially grow the service into a $1 billion business.

ADT announces new management line-up

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Wednesday, April 11, 2012

Taking another step toward independence, ADT on April 10 announced the post-split management line-up, highlighting the appointment of Kathryn Mikells and laying out ADT North America’s financials, key performance metrics, strategic priorities and more in a Form 10 registration with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

The form says that Tyco, ADT’s parent company, “does not intend to comment publicly on ADT Form 10.” Tyco announced in September 2011 that it would split into three separate, publicly traded entities: Flow Control; the The ADT Corporation; and Tyco International (comprised of Tyco Integrated Security and Fire).

In addition to Mikells, the management team reporting to Naren Gursahaney—current president of Tyco’s ADT North American residential and small business security segment and future CEO of The ADT Corporation—will include David Bleisch, legal; Anita Graham, HR; Don Boerema, corporate development; Mark Edoff, Business Optimization; Steve Gribbon, sales; Shawn Lucht operations. The eighth member of the team, in charge of marketing will be announced in the future.

Not listed on the managemtnt roster is John Koch, current president of ADT, who plans to leave ADT, sources told Security Systems News.

According to the filing, ADT had 2011 operating income of $693 million and revenue of $3.1 billion, with 89 percent of that revenue being recurring. It has 6.4 million customers and estimates that it owns 25 percent of the $12.5 billion residential and small business security market in the U.S. and Canada. A chart says ADT and IMS Research estimate that Protection 1 has 4 percent of that market, Monitronics has 3 percent and Vivint has 2 percent. “Thousands of others” share the remaining 66 percent of the market.

Among ADT’s stated strategies is growing its small business segment. ADT said it will expand its  “small business field sales force, which currently represents only about one-third of our overall direct sales force. We plan to provide strengthened small business marketing support to this enhanced sales force, including by building a larger, more robust partner network to improve our lead generation capabilities and by assisting in marketing additional value-added services, including ADT Pulse,” according to the Form 10 statement.

ADT intends to continue to “explore opportunities to provide ADT-branded solutions through additional channels, including telecommunications companies, broadband and cable companies, retailers and public and private utilities.”

“In addition, through our efficient operating model we believe we can significantly reduce the cost of basic security installation and services, opening up the potential for a much larger portion of households to purchase monitored security,” the form says.

Metrics noted on the filing include the following: The company’s attrition rate dropped from 14.3 percent in 2009 to 13.3 percent in 2010 to 13 percent in 2011, while ARPU (average revenue per user) went from $35.92 in 2009 to $36.10 in 2010 to $37.24 in 2011.

On the appointment of Mikells, Gursahaney  said in a prepared statement: “Kathryn brings impressive financial leadership expertise and a proven track record of managing transformation while driving financial discipline,”

Mikells, joins ADT from Nalco, a water treatment and energy technology company, where she was CFO. Previously, she worked for 16 years for UAL Corporation, the parent company of United Airlines, where she was EVP and CFO.

Tyco post-split talk Part II: Are acquisitions in the air?

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Thursday, November 3, 2011

Here’s Part II (I posted Part I yesterday) of a blog with some Tyco post-split details, which I found in the process of reviewing the Tyco International Conference Call. The call took place on the day that Tyco announced its plan to split into three publicly traded companies.

On that day, most of the industry, including yours truly, was running around the ASIS show floor. The quotes below are courtesy of Seeking Alpha.

Was the split construed to ready Fire & Security or ADT for acquisition? And, is there any government regulation that would preclude the acquisition of ADT or Commercial Fire and Security from taking place in the next 18 months?

Asked if Tyco had “not had substantive conversations with any outside parties about the sale of any of these businesses?” Tyco CEO Ed Breen said: “We are well aware of the laws and regulations out there and … we are very careful about what we do. So I will leave it at that.”
 
OK, well is there anything to preclude one of the entities from being acquired in the next 18 months?
“If anyone approaches us about a piece of the … our Board would have to take that under advisement. It is our fiduciary responsibility, but it is not our plan. Our plan is to get these out there on their own and let them play in the their industry,” Breen said.

Answering a question on a different topic, Breen said: “I’m a big believer that there going to be consolidation in these industries. I think you’ve already been watching some of that occur and we want our businesses to be able to play in that environment in their respective industries.”

Asked about the split between resi and commercial security, Breen said much of the separation has occurred already, when ADT split into residential and commercial divisions.

And, in terms of the monitoring operation, Breen said they have a plan about how to separate the two and “it’s easier than it sounds.”

Whey didn’t they bifurcate the two businesses back in 2006? The companies were too fragmented at that time, Breen said. “The management teams were more fragmented and there wasn’t consistent performance.”
 

Tyco post-split Part I: Dealer news; New Fire & Security group to save $

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Wednesday, November 2, 2011

Will ADT grow its dealer or internal sales groups post split? How will Tyco save $400 million to $500 million mostly from the new Commercial Fire and Security division?

I found some interesting details on those questions when I finally had a chance—on a recent long plane ride—to review the Tyco International Conference Call. The call took place on the day that Tyco announced its plan to split into three publicly traded companies.

On that day, most of the industry, including yours truly, were running around the ASIS show floor. The quotes below are courtesy of Seeking Alpha.

ADT to grow internal sales force

ADT residential currently derives about half of its business from its dealers and half from its internal sales force, but the goal is “to get more internal sales people, [and] keep the dealer channel where it’s at,” said Tyco CEO Ed Breen during a recent Tyco earnings call.

“We have a good business there, but [we will] continue to increase on the direct side of the house,” he added. ADT serves more than 6 million homes and small businesses, has more than $3b in annualized revenue (90 percent of that from RMR.) Its average creation cost for accounts is $1,000, according to the call.

Naren Gursahaney, who is now president of Security Solutions and who joined Tyco in 2003, will become CEO of ADT. And, ADT will no longer be officially headquartered in Switzerland with the rest of Tyco. Presumably it will be in Boca Raton, its U.S. headquarters. Asked about ADT’s resi business abroad, Breen said that most of its business outside of the U.S. is commercial, and regardless, ADT overseas business has always been managed by commercial…so there’s not a change there. Of the estimated $10 billion in revenue Commercial Fire and Security, about $1 billion is RMR from fire and security and most of the security business is commercial, with a little residential, he said.

Commercial Fire and Security business key to to $400m - $500m savings

When the fire and commercial security business are combined, the new approximately $10 billion entity will be the “largest global provider of fire and security products and service.” This entity will continue to list Schaffhausen Switzerland as its headquarters. Its CEO will be George Oliver.   

Breen said Tyco as a whole will save $400 to $500 million over “multiple years” as a result of the split. The bulk of that savings will come from Commercial Fire and Security and the Flow Control business, he said.

At Commercial Fire & Security “we’re bringing together a security commercial company and a fire commercial company, all extremely global with all the back offices. So you can imagine not only do we get those synergies htat we talked about but when we bring those two businesses together, which have been managed separately, that helps us a little more create that synergy.”

He said the combined businesses will make a “big push” to go after enterprise business and said that “we’ve created key verticals, on one of our key verticals, for instance in Security and Fire is oil and gas … we’re not going to miss the opportunity to really go dive deep on those…”

Look for more on Tyco post-split tomorrow in this space.

Standards bodies making progress

News from SIA, PSIA and ONVIF speak of strides being made
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06/21/2011

YARMOUTH, Maine—The security industry bodies that have stepped forward to advocate for a standardized future for physical security have all made moves and issued press releases recently that tout progress being made. SIA, PSIA and ONVIF all say that in the short time since ISC West, more and more compliant products have been released and have been demonstrated to work seamlessly together.

Schneider said to mull bid for Tyco

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04/12/2011

PARIS—Schneider Electric, based here, is working with bankers to assess a bid for Tyco International, according to an April 11 Bloomberg report, which cited “three people with knowledge of the matter.”

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