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ADT to acquire Devcon Security for $148 million

ADT looking for more acquisitions
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07/31/2013

BOCA RATON, Fla.—The ADT Corp. announced this morning that it plans to acquire Devcon Security from Golden Gate Capital for $148.5 million. The deal—ADT’s first major acquisition since spinning off from Tyco International last fall—brings 117,000 accounts and $3.6 million of RMR. The transaction is expected to close in early August, Naren Gursahaney, ADT CEO, said during an investor call today.

ADT goes after small business

Orbegoso: Opportunity is significant; only 50 percent of small businesses have monitored security
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04/14/2014

BOCA RATON, Fla.—ADT is going after small business with targeted offerings for specific vertical markets, the first of which it launched on April 10.

ADT’s move into commercial security, fire

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Wednesday, March 26, 2014

Will ADT move into the larger commercial security market when its non-compete expires with Tyco?

I contacted ADT to see if I could talk to someone about it. Cheryl Stopnick, director of dealer communications, responded, and told me that ADT's not going to discuss business plans at this time.

They may not be discussing plans, but it certainly seems like they’re making them.

Right now ADT does commercial security for small businesses, which ADT defines as those businesses that are 7,500 square feet or less. ADT and Tyco came up with that definition when ADT spun off from Tyco. At that time it entered into a non-compete agreement with Tyco Integrated Security. That agreement expires Sept. 30, 2014.

As Luis J. Orbegoso, president of ADT’s Small Business Unit, said during a Dec. 6 investor call (according to seekingalpha.com), the “ADT brand has supported not only small businesses but also medium and enterprise businesses for almost 140 years. And our current definition of a small business as a location that is 7,500 square feet or less is somewhat arbitrary and not necessarily a true reflection of the market. It was actually the result of our non-compete zone improvement with Tyco, which expires in 10 months.”

Orbegoso knows commercial security. He joined ADT in 2013. Before that he was with UTC for five years, where he led the commercial security business (though I think he held a few titles while he was there, which seems to be the norm for the security folks at UTC). He came to UTC as part of the GE Security buy.

During the Dec. 6 conference call, (again, according to seekingalpha.com) Orbegoso said “once this noncompete expires, we will have the ability to take a look at possible adjacencies, such as commercial fire solutions and larger commercial and enterprise security offerings that we can integrate and leverage with our existing infrastructure and customers. These adjacencies could potentially quadruple our addressable markets. And again, today we are extremely encouraged by the momentum that we have in this space and our ability to execute.”

The potential is definitely there with the larger commercial projects, according to the folks at Imperial Capital. Jeff Kessler estimates that the security market in businesses smaller than 7,500 square feet is $2 to $3 billion, but the the market segment that includes businesses that are 7,500- to 25,000 square feet is an $18 billion to $20 billion market segment.

I spoke to some folks in the industry (aside from TycoIS) who currently do work in that market segment and they fully expect ADT to jump in to that market.

And while it’s an opportunity, not everyone believes it's an $18 billion-plus opportunity. It may be on paper, but one integrator told me “that’s a segment that’s been stuck in neutral for a lot of years.”

The commercial fire business, on the other hand, if you can get the right people on board—and ADT certainly has the resources for that—could be a more immediate opportunity.

Orbegoso has instituted many changes in the way ADT approaches security for small businesses. It was typically treated as a kind of  “extension of residential security,” but that’s the not the case any more. It will be very interesting to see how Orbegoso and ADT approach this new, larger, more complex market segment.

There may be disagreement about market segment size, but there’s general agreement that ADT has the potential to have some meaningful impact in this segment.

Imperial Capital: Growth in smart home market will benefit large security companies, but not smaller ones

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Tuesday, March 25, 2014

I recently wrote about a new ABI Research report that predicts professional security companies’ share of the smart home market will be cut in half by 2019 as telecom and cableco competitors leverage their own strengths in the space.

However, not all security companies will fare the same, according to a new report from Imperial Capital, a New York City full-service investment bank. Imperial Capital says that large security companies will do much better than smaller ones as the smart home market grows.

Imperial Capital’s latest prediction on the market for the next six to seven years was released today. It differs from the ABI report in that it drills down more on how size matters.

Simply put, what Imperial Capital predicts is that the top 30 residential security companies will do well over that time period, whereas “the bottom 80 percent of security providers” will see negative growth.

The report, authored by Jeff Kessler, Imperial Capital’s managing director of institutional research, says that Imperial Capital’s and ABI’s views on the market are “generally consistent.” However, Kessler writes, “our biggest difference with the ABI report may be that it does not separate out the top 30 security companies from the rest of the industry, which may very well have customer generation problems.”

Those big companies will do well, Imperial Capital says in its report.

“Our estimates are that the market for home services will grow about 10 percent annually over the next seven years to over 50 million homes, driven by new applications form the security industry, new home services offerings, and marketing from cable and telcos,” the report says. “We estimate the top 30 residential security companies will grow subscribers at about 5 percent annually, from about 11 million current users to about 16-17 million users, driven mainly by life-safety focused subscribers to whom professional response and service and the certainty of police, fire, and personal emergency response is more important than price and bundling convenience.”

However, the report says, “this is offset in our analysis by all other smaller security companies falling from 12 million to 5 or 6 million by 2020.”

When you add those companies—which Imperial Capital says comprise 80 percent of security providers—to the top providers, “we see the security industry as flat to down in this period. In fact, because of this estimated decline in the revenues of small companies, our aggregate estimate of market share is actually more conservative [in] stance than the ABI Study.”

Imperial Capital also believes the smart home market will grow even more than ABI predicts.

“Where we also diverge with the ABI report is in the size of the market six to seven years from now,” the Imperial Capital report says. “ABI estimates a market in six years that is 37 percent larger, and Imperial Capital estimates that it will almost double in six years. The difference, we contend, is new services and technologies from the likes of Alarm.com, Vivint, and iControl … [and also more] “PERS” (personal emergency response systems) home health care and emergency response users. These advanced PERS applications are also being developed.”

HID reportedly paid $60m for Lumidigm

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Wednesday, February 12, 2014

Updated 2/13/14

Identity solution provider HID this week made its second purchase in a month, buying fingerprint biometric provider Lumidigm.
In January,  HID announced that it had purchased IdenTrust, a provider of digital identities.

The Albuquerque Journal is reporting that HID paid more than $60 million for the biometric company. Through a spokesperson HID said that because this is a "private transaction" the company would not comment on the purchase price.

I was not able to speak to Jeff Kessler at Imperial Capital about the deal. (Imperial advised Lumidigm,) but I did get a look at a research brief Kessler published on Feb. 12, where he said this deal "continues to put distance between Assa Abloy’s HID Division and the competition in the way of interoperable, identity solutions for government and enterprise users."

Here's more from Kessler's brief:

In our opinion, Assa Abloy has made a concerted effort to become the undisputed leader in higher technology access control and identification solutions for not just enterprises and institutions, but for Government as well—the latter is an area in which it did not have a lot of traction until 2011. However, a series of acquisitions have turned the company into the leader in this segment from a revenue perspective. This is unlike Safran (which purchased L-1 in 2010), which is primarily involved in registration and border identification. The challenge remains for Assa Abloy and HID to integrate these acquired technologies and companies carefully, to let some of the more creative sectors provide both competitive advantage to Assa Abloy, yet still remain the leading providers of software and identity solutions to other companies in the industry as well.

Founded in 2001 and based in Albuquerque, N.M., Lumidigm has 33 employees. Its 2014 sales are expected to be $25 million, and the deal is expected to be accretive to earnings per share, according to HID parent company ASSA ABLOY.

Common problems with fingerprint biometrics include that fact that the technology will not work in harsh environments or when peoples’ fingers are dirty. In addition, some peoples’ fingerprints are simply not detectable. Lumidigm’s technology overcomes these problems, HID said, with its patented “multispectral imaging technology [that] uses multiple light spectrums and advanced polarization techniques to extract unique fingerprint characteristics from both the surface and subsurface of the skin.” The technology is also highly effective in detecting “imposter or ‘spoof’ fingerprints,” according to HID.  

Lumidigm’s products are used in verticals such as banking, healthcare, entertainment, and government services. HID is also interested in Lumidigm’s “premier global customer base,” HID CEO Denis Hebert said in a prepared statement.  

The opportunity for HID, according to a statement from Bob Harbour, executive chairman of Lumidigm is: “to apply multispectral imaging capabilities to credential acquisition and authentication, gesture recognition, and other image-based process control systems, making multi-factor authentication on a single, integrated device a reality.”

Brink’s getting back into home security?

Company’s CEO says it is considering re-entry
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02/06/2014

RICHMOND, Va.—Brink’s got out of the home security market in 2008 but may be reentering that market, the company’s CEO said recently.

ADT releases Q1 results—and stock price drops

But Imperial Capital maintains ‘outperform’ rating on ADT, saying it expects ‘positive catalysts’ from the company in 2014
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01/30/2014

BOCA RATON, Fla.—Although The ADT Corp. reported Jan. 30 that ADT Pulse take rates and recurring revenue were up in its latest quarter, it also said net income decreased 27 percent in that period—and its share price tumbled.

Digital Life, Imperial Capital join PPVAR

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Wednesday, January 15, 2014

Several organizations recently joined PPVAR’s growing membership roster, but two of the new additions are particularly striking. Digital Life, a home management platform from AT&T, is now on board, according to Keith Jentoft, an industry liaison for PPVAR. This comes about seven months after Digital Life earned CSAA Five Diamond certification.

Investment bank Imperial Capital also joined the organization. This is doubtless an interesting development as well, with Imperial being the organization's first member from the private investment side. In a certain sense, an investment bank showing interest in video verified monitoring seems unsurprising, given signs of the technology's more mainstream direction, plus the technology’s ability to drive higher average revenue returns per customer. Additionally, when a private investment bank allies itself with a best-practices organization, it suggests their interest in the value proposition runs fairly deep.

The group also added The Illinois Alarm Association and the Michigan Association of Police Chiefs as members—both organizations the likes of which we've become more accustomed to seeing engage with PPVAR, an organization focused on pooling knowledge from members in both public and private sectors.

As PPVAR forges ahead toward its goal of written standards for video verification, I’ll be keen to see what kind of bearings its new members have on the organization’s direction. Will the addition of Digital Life compel other cablecos and telecoms to join? And with respect to Imperial Capital, I’m curious to see what kind of role they play in promoting PPVAR’s cause. Will their membership generate further interest in video verification from other private investment groups?

The organization is convening in the coming days, Jentoft said. After they do, I hope to get a clearer picture of where the organization is at this stage of the process.

ADT working to ‘stabilize’ dealer program

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Wednesday, December 11, 2013

ADT officials weren’t available for comment when I wrote recently about an industry’s analyst’s report on how ADT had “culled” about 100 low-performing companies in order to improve its dealer program over the past year.

But in an ADT investor call last Friday, Alan Ferber, president of ADT’s residential business unit, confirmed much of what the analyst, Jeff Kessler, Imperial Capital’s managing director of institutional research, had said. Ferber also outlined ways ADT is working to “stabilize” that channel.

According to Seeking Alpha, which published a transcript of the Dec. 6 investor call, Ferber said:

So in 2013, we began to optimize our dealer channel to focus more resources on those that are [indiscernible] to evolving with ADT's overall direction and the trend towards automation. And while we're eliminating about 100 dealers, which obviously impacted overall net adds, our focus on the right dealers has resulted in the quality of the customers that come through that channel to remain high and actually have been improving. ARPU is about 10% above our average ARPU and growing about 5% over the past year and the creation multiple has actually come down even though there's been an increase in SAC. But we do remain focused on strengthening and continue to optimize this dealer channel to drive growth over time.

… In addition, channel growth was impacted by some changes among our largest dealers. We purchased 1, 1 had some cash flow issues that impacted their ability to increase adds and 1 left ADT for a competitive program. I'm very pleased, however, to report that, that dealer has now returned to the ADT family once he experienced the negative impact on his business of not having the powerful ADT brand behind him. So it's reconfirmed our dealer value proposition with that dealer and with many other dealers as well.

But more importantly, we're taking a number of actions to stabilize this channel. We are investing in enhanced funding to help drive further Pulse adoption, particularly higher end Pulse, where that higher level of automation has a very significant retention benefit as well. And increased funding will also enable some incremental sales and marketing activities by our dealers and also the recruitment of new high-quality dealers that are positioned to further drive automation.

… We're also investing in staffing and support to ensure success. We've added resources to provide better support for planning and performance management, and we've enhanced training and other tools to get new and existing dealers more productive, particularly with our new services. And while we certainly expect some noise in the next couple of quarters, we do believe these actions are establishing a very strong foundation for growth over time.

 

 

Growth prospects positive for IR spinoff Allegion

As a stand-alone entity, Allegion will have free cash flow of $150 to $200m solely for security
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12/03/2013

DUBLIN, Ireland—Ingersoll Rand spinoff company, Allegion, is now an independent, pure play security company, “a $2 billion startup” with potential for continued growth in North America and big growth outside of North America, according to Allegion executives Dave Petratis and Tim Eckersley, as well as security analyst Jeff Kessler, who all spoke to Security Systems News.

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