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ESA’s Chwat rates the regulation and legislation of interest in 2015

Broadband initiative is front of mind for ESA’s lobbyist
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01/30/2015

ALEXANDRIA, Va.—From changes in the way broadband will be expanded to federal funding for school security technology to nursing home surveillance, there is plenty of legislation of interest to security installers on Capitol Hill, according to John Chwat, ESA’s director of government relations.

Access control now a basic need at schools, but a ‘culture of security’ tops lists

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12/29/2014

YARMOUTH, Maine—Two years after the tragic shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn. brought renewed awareness to security needs in public school buildings, experts in the field say the most important measure of progress is not new technology or even new applications of existing technologies.

ESA pushes forward during lame-duck session

A number of important issues still on table will, at least, be picked up next year
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11/04/2014

ALEXANDRIA, Va.—The Electronic Security Association doesn’t expect much to happen to benefit the industry in the waning days of the lame-duck Congressional session, but that doesn’t mean it’s not pursuing its goals to the fullest.

SIA questions GSA pricing policy

Anecdotal evidence shows companies are being unfairly rejected
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10/08/2014

WASHINGTON—Uncertainties surrounding the General Service Administration’s new schedule pricing policies for products and services need to be further examined, according to Jake Parker, government relations director at the Security Industry Association.

'Net neutrality' necessary for alarm signals

Industry takes action to ensure ISPs do not interfere with alarm data; ESA, AICC petition FCC
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09/10/2014

WASHINGTON—Concerned about fair, reliable and accurate transmission of alarm data, the ESA and the Alarm Industry Communications Committee are urging the FCC to support net neutrality.

Talking panels and keypads with Marshall Marinace

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09/08/2014

YORKTOWN HEIGHTS, N.Y.—Marshall Marinace, owner of Marshal Alarm Systems, based here, was installed at ESX 2014 as the new president of the Electronic Security Association. Here's how he handles security at home.

Idaho AG: Door-knocking company must reform sales tactics

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Wednesday, August 13, 2014

I’ve written before about how ADT filed not just one, but two lawsuits against Orem, Utah-based Vision Security, accusing the door-knocking company of scamming customers. And I’ve also written about how Vision Security contends it is being unfairly targeted.

Now, a new settlement Vision has reached with the Idaho Office of the Attorney General paints a picture of Vision sales reps engaging in unfair sales practices in that state.

I reached out earlier this week to Vision attorney Sean Brown for that company’s comments on the settlement but I haven’t yet gotten a response.

However, according to the office of Idaho Attorney General Lawrence Wasden, Vision reached a settlement with that state after being accused of violating Idaho's Consumer Protection Act.

The settlement requires Vision “to implement significant changes to the way its sales representatives interact with Idaho consumers,” according to a July 18 news release from the AG’s office. Also, consumers who paid extra fees because they were scammed may be entitled to a refund from Vision if they submit a complaint form to the AG’s office by Sept. 8, the release said.

Here’s more of what the AG had to say in the release:

"The purchase of a home-security system is a significant investment and consumers should feel safe knowing that the people selling them are providing truthful and honest information, without hidden fees or misrepresentation," Attorney General Wasden said.

Consumers reported to the Attorney General that Vision Security's door-to-door sales representatives misrepresented the terms the company's security system contracts, and that representatives failed to fulfill their promises to "buy-out" consumers' current security system contracts.

Consumers often ended up paying monthly monitoring fees to two companies or paid large termination fees to cancel one of their monitoring agreements. Additionally, Vision Security's door-to-door sales contracts failed to provide consumers with accurate information about the time allowed to cancel contracts.

The settlement requires Vision Security to make several changes to how it does business in Idaho. For example, the company's sales representatives:

*Must wear identification that includes the sales person's name and affiliation with Vision Security.
*Must inform the consumer of his or her three-day right to cancel the agreement.*Must not tell consumers that their current alarm monitoring company went out of business or is affiliated with Vision Security.
*Must not misrepresent the number of security systems Vision Security has installed in the consumer's neighborhood or misrepresent that a consumer's home is located in a high-crime area
 *Must not misrepresent the condition or operability of the consumer's current security system.
 *Must not promise to "buy-out" a consumer's current monitoring agreement.
 

Hmmm…this list reads a lot like some new revisions the Electronic Security Association made to its code of ethics this summer in response to some new sales scams that ADT and other companies have complained door-knocking companies are using.

 

 

Poll: Readers view door-to-door scams as major problem

Impassioned responses reveal just how much door-knocking scams rankle those in the industry
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07/30/2014

YARMOUTH, Maine—Door-to-door scams were given a big stage at ESX 2014, where ADT held a press conference devoted to rooting the problem out, with representatives from law enforcement, CSAA and ESA weighing in.

ESX 2014 draws more than 2,000 security professionals

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07/29/2014

IRVING, Texas—ESX 2014, held in June in the Music City Center of Nashville, drew more than 2,000 professionals and 200-plus exhibitors, according to a news release from the Electronic Security Association.

ESA says school security spending needs to be about equipment

ESA government relations director: ‘Not one dime’ spent on equipment
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07/16/2014

WASHINGTON—The U.S. government has devoted more than $300 million over the past two years to enhancing school security. While that money has gone toward the production of reports, research, assessments and position papers, among other things, it has not gone toward the actual installation of electronic security systems, John Chwat, director of government relations at the Electronic Security Association, told Security Systems News.

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