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Physical security market to reach $85 billion by 2018

New applications for video surveillance, biometrics and access control expected to drive growth in North America
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09/10/2013

PUNE, India—Demand among government agencies, large enterprises and tech establishments is expected to push the global physical security market, currently worth about $55 billion, to a value of $85 billion by 2018, according to a new report by the research company MarketsandMarkets.

TOTUS, SecureWatch24 announce partnership

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09/04/2013

AUSTIN, Texas—TOTUS Solutions, Inc. and SecureWatch24 have teamed up to offer a channel partnership combining lighting-based security systems and video surveillance. The companies announced the deal Sept. 3.

Observations on a surveillance camera discussion forum

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Friday, August 9, 2013

A topic surfaced today on the Security Industry Group’s LinkedIn forum that piqued my interest at first on a particular level, but then on a broader, more general one.

The topic was initiated by a link to an instructional sequence relating how some ne’er-do-well can erect homemade spray paint contraptions to blot out hard-to-reach surveillance cameras, rendering them ineffective. The device appears laughably crude, but that’s not to say it couldn’t achieve its ends. Assembling it requires a hodgepodge of junk, including but not limited to a tree pruner, a bicycle brake bar and a wine bottle opener.

The link was clearly offered as a launching pad for discussion about a potential industry-related problem. It proved instead to be the source of some acrimony. The respondent who posted the link was charged by critics with being irresponsible for disseminating the information and, by extension, aiding the hooligans who might be inclined to undertake in the destruction of surveillance property.

While I might not agree with the criticism, I can see the rationale. The harm in taking part in the transfer of this kind information, so the reasoning goes, ultimately outweighs the good that might result from an open discussion about it. But here’s the thing about the Internet: The information’s already out there. It’s already totally accessible to whomever cares to find it. Another respondent, defending the original poster, correctly pointed this out.

The web is an ambiguous medium. It has the capacity to facilitate the transfer of information both good and bad. But there’s also some danger in merely dismissing a problem on the grounds that doing the opposite—confronting it head-on—could somehow help siphon the information to the wrong people. Speaking only in whispers about a problem could prove even more counterproductive.

At its core the web is a medium that wants to be open, not closed. It wants to include, share, inform, engage, improve, discuss, inquire. From a professional standpoint, industry-based forums like the many on LinkedIn can be a valuable stage for these kinds of discussions. If someone in the industry identifies a problem or vulnerability, what simpler or faster way to get a broad industry perspective on that topic than by crowdsourcing other professionals online? 

Fired AlarmForce CEO fighting his ouster

Joel Matlin, who founded the company, says he has a legal strategy to remove board members who forced him out
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08/07/2013

TORONTO—The recently ousted CEO of AlarmForce Industries, one of Canada’s largest security companies, said he’s planning a legal strategy designed to replace the board members who fired him.

Axis stays atop IHS video surveillance rankings, claims top spot for video encoders

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06/21/2013

CHELMSFORD, Mass.—Axis Communications, a provider of network video surveillance solutions, retained the top spot in IHS Research’s annual rankings of the top video surveillance companies, according to a news release.

BRS Labs announces summer seminar series

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06/19/2013

HOUSTON—Behavioral Recognition Systems Labs, a developer of security solutions software and artificial intelligence, has announced its 2013 IP Video Surveillance Academy summer seminar series.

Genetec launches cloud-based video surveillance powered by Windows

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06/17/2013

MONTREAL—Genetec, a provider of IP security solutions, has announced the availability of Stratocast, a video surveillance system powered by Microsoft’s Windows Azure cloud-computing platform.

IMS finds end users boosting budgets for physical security gear

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06/12/2013

WELLINGBOROUGH, England—Budgets for physical security equipment continue to defy the sluggish economic recovery, with 45 percent of end users reporting that their security funding increased during 2012, according to a survey conducted by IMS Research, now part of IHS Inc.

Bosch launches new sales team

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06/12/2013

FAIRPORT, N.Y.—Bosch Security Systems has created a new inside sales team to better service its customers with a more “focused approach,” according to a company statement.

Surveillance cameras called ‘worse than useless’ in Philly

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Wednesday, June 5, 2013

It’s not the kind of press you would expect for video surveillance, especially after all of the positive PR for helping bring down the suspects in the Boston Marathon bombing. Only onward and upward, right?

Apparently Philadelphia didn’t get the memo.

Last week, City Controller Alan Butkovitz announced the results of an audit of the police department’s surveillance camera program. The news wasn’t favorable: Only 32 percent of the cameras reviewed were functioning as they should, down from 45 percent found to working properly during a random sampling last year.

“That means that at any given time when crime is occurring around our city, only a third of the cameras are able to capture criminal activity at camera locations,” Butkovitz told the Philadelphia Daily News. He said the system is “worse than useless” because it gives residents a false sense of security.

Butkovitz said the problems included blurry images with pixelated edges and condensation in camera domes, making it difficult or impossible to read license plates and identify crime suspects.

“Suppose that had been the quality of photos in the Boston bombing,” Butkovitz told KYW Newsradio, letting listeners draw their own conclusions.

Mayor Michael Nutter was quick to respond to the assertions, calling Butkovitz’s report inaccurate. Nutter said that by his administration’s count, 85 percent of the 216 police cameras were working as of May 27.

Asked by the Daily News why there was such a wide discrepancy in the figures, Nutter said, “I can’t account for the controller’s inability to count. … We know what cameras work. [Butkovitz] does some kind of sampling. We actually pay attention to all of the cameras.”

Regardless of who’s right, Philly’s spat highlights the benefits for the security industry post-Boston. For cities that don’t have a video surveillance system, the law enforcement benefits of adding one have never been more obvious. For cities that are already onboard, now is the time to make sure the systems are doing what they’re supposed to be doing. That goes for the monitoring side as well.

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