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Vanderbilt Industries to acquire Siemen’s Security Products

Deal expected to be complete end of 1Q 2015
 - 
10/20/2014

FRANKFURT, Germany—Security systems provider Vanderbilt Industries has entered into an agreement to acquire Siemen’s Security Products business, part of Siemen’s Building Technologies Division.

Video companies branching out into access control

Watch for more video companies to follow suit
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10/10/2014

YARMOUTH, Maine—In the past 18 months, three major video surveillance companies have expanded into access control. There are many reasons why Axis Communications, Panasonic and Avigilon made this move, but the main reason, they say, is because of demand.

Report: Growth rate for service offerings to soar

VSaaS, ACaaS expected to enjoy some of highest growth rates in security equipment and services market during forecast period
 - 
10/01/2014

WELLINGBOROUGH, England—The North American market for physical security equipment and services is poised to exceed $61 billion by 2018, up from $44.4 billion in revenues in 2013, according to a new report, “Physical Security Equipment & Services Report—2014,” from IHS Research, a market research firm based here.

N.C. school district moves from people to tech for access control

42 schools to receive Aiphone system
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09/11/2014

WILMINGTON, N.C.—Visitors to most schools in the New Hanover County district at the start of the new school year will be viewed on video before being allowed in. For the 42-school district, which previously “relied on people” for access control, that’s a big security move, its safety director said.

Securing the 9/11 Memorial Museum, Plaza and Pavilion

‘The first instinct is to customize something, but you don’t want to fall into that trap. You stick with proven technologies’
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07/28/2014

NEW YORK—Cameras, access control, intrusion detectors, magnetometers, radio communication: There’s much involved in designing a new facility’s complete security system. When you’re designing that system for the 9/11 Memorial Museum, Plaza and Pavilion, which opened in May, it’s even more complicated.

Viscount will be highly visible at ASIS

 - 
Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Viscount, the access control system that is software-based and does not have a panel, will be highly visible at ASIS, according to CEO Dennis Raefield.

Raefield joined Viscount at COO in December of 2013 and became CEO of the company, replacing Steve Pineau, in January of 2014. In February, Viscount "raised $2.4 million in new cash in a  private placement." He's used that funding to "staff up" adding tech support and sales people including hiring Michael Pilato, as VP of sales and marketing. Pilato has worked for Schlage/Ingersoll Rand, Assa Abloy, Honeywell Security, and Sensormatic/Software House (now Tyco).

"We went from 26 to 36 employees," Raefield said. "We now have dedicated tech support from 5 a.m. to 5 p.m. and on-call support 24/7," he said.

Viscount has been in business for 12 years, but its Freedom Encryption Bridge access control product is relatively new. It made traction with the federal government, in banking and it is  installed at Microsoft's GSOC.

"Our biggest deal is with the Department of Homeland Security, the CIS (Citizens Immigration Services) Group. [Freedom] is installed all over the country in 30 different sites and the plan is to roll out 200 more sites in the next year," Raefield said.

Freedom is doing well for two reasons, Raefield said. "One. It's highly secure from hacking for a very simple reason. The traditional [access control] panel has a database ... that is highly vulnerable to hacking. ... What we did is very simple. We took that database out of the panel," he explained. "We use a little thing called a bridge that converts all information at the door ... sends it to the company's own computer. Our software is on their server and the server makes the decision [about access]." This makes the IT director much more comfortable than a traditional access control system where a security appliance that is out of the IT director's hands is hanging on the company's network, he said.

Because the Freedom access control system is behind a company's firewall, it is as secure as any other application on an end user's network, Raefield pointed out.

Raefield noted that the recent Target data breach which received so much publicity and resulted in the firing of the Target CEO "was not a frontal assault on the IT infrastructure" but rather a "backdoor breach"—the result of a stolen HVAC contractor's password. That kind of backdoor breach cannot happen with this access control system, he said.

The second reason the federal government likes Freedom, according to Raefield, is that "our little bridge is much less expensive that anyone's panel. ... "You take out the expensive control panel and the dedicated computer for security and you now have a significaly lower total cost of ownership," he said.

The security director now can worrry about physical security instead of managing hardware and computers, he added.

Viscount Systems did about $4.1 million in revenue in 2013. About $3 million of that came from Viscount's legacy telephone entry system, a product called Mesh Enterphone, which is used in highrise buildings. It's been a "stable bread and butter" product for Viscount for 12 years. Raefield is also investing in that product, making it "high end with a touch screen." It can also be integrated with the Freedom access control system. The remaining $1 million in 2013 revenue was from Freedom, which Raefield said went from $0 to $1 million in one year. Raefield expects Viscount, which is a publicly traded company based in Vancouver, to do "between $6 and $8 million" in revenue in 2014.

Asked about whether Freedom can be used as a managed access control system, Raefield said yes. "The long term strategy is that [Freedom] will be able to be managed on site, in the cloud, any of the above, because it's all software."

Viscount is currently working with major integrators such as Stanley, Convergint and Johnson Controls. At ASIS, the company plans to make its case from a big booth to the integrator community that "this is the next direction and a smart direction," Raefield said.

Pilato said that Freedom has been rigorously tested by the federal government, it has shown itself to be "secure, scalable architecture" and it's ready for wider deployment in the commercial market, in K-12 schools, in banking and elsewhere. "ASIS will be the official commercial launch of Freedom," Pilato said. "The commercial side of the house is ready for prime time."

 

 

 

 

 

 

AMAG selected for Hudson Yards

 - 
07/22/2014

TORRANCE, Calif.—Hudson Yards has selected AMAG Technology’s Symmetry Enterprise v7.0.1 Card Access Control System to secure 10 Hudson Yards in New York City, the first office tower under construction in the development.

ONVIF, SIA announce access control standards cooperation

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06/10/2014

SAN RAMON, Calif.—ONVIF, a global standardization for IP-based physical security products, announced recently that it has signed a memorandum of understanding with the Security Industry Association, signaling cooperation toward the further development of IP-based interop

Disaster recovery within 15 minutes at Delta

Duplicate site and drills ensure business continuity
 - 
05/28/2014

ATLANTA—If Delta Air Lines’ Operations Control Center is incapacitated due to a fire, extreme weather or bomb, it can set up within 15 minutes at a duplicate facility already in place nearby. That’s been proven during yearly drills.

Viscount Systems wins in Maine and Fla.

 - 
05/05/2014

BURNABY, British Columbia-Viscount Systems, a provider of security software and services, won two additional U.S. federal government contracts to secure facilities in Maine and Florida.

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