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John Kovach

Honeywell: New ‘installer-friendly’ sensors represent next evolution in motion detector technology

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08/22/2014

MELVILLE, N.Y.—Honeywell this week introduced the IS3000 and DT8000 Series of hardwired sensors—a portfolio of seven high-performance indoor motion detectors for virtually any installation, from the most basic residential to the most complex commercial application.

‘Cookie ladies’ sweeten products showcase

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Friday, November 11, 2011

The first night at Honeywell’s First Alert Professional annual convention is traditionally an opening reception with a buffet and casual social networking time.

Well, last night at the start of the 2011 convention that I'm attending here in Scottsdale, Ariz. there was something a little different. After the buffet in a ballroom at the Westin Kierland Resort & Spa—food with a Tex-Mex theme, yum!—everyone wandered over to the nearby hall where Honeywell for the first time decided to put on an after-hours Products & Services Showcase. And the showcase was enhanced by the amazing “cookie ladies.”

Convention attendees—I’m told there are about 700 this year—strolled around watching demonstrations of the latest technology and talking to vendors while sipping wine, beer and other drinks from a bar and also enjoying desserts—some of the most luscious of which were served by two beautiful young women who were literally walking dessert trays.

Dressed in bright red off-the-shoulder dresses, the two looked like Flamenco dancers from the waist up. But their bodies rose out of the middle of round dessert carts that obscured the lower half of their bodies. The round, wheeled carts were skirted with red material so looked like the women’s hoop skirts. The carts rolled along as the women walked, stopping here and there to let people help themselves to the powdered-sugar-drenched cookies spread out on the carts.

The young women were charming and gracious (one posed for a picture with me—the sight has to be seen to be believed—and I’ll get that up on this site as soon as the photographer emails it to me) and convention-goers told me they enjoyed the unique method of serving up something sweet.

One was John Loud, owner of Loud Security Systems and president of the Georgia Electronic Life Safety and Security Association. “In any business, you try to do something different to bring some value in,”he observed to me.

He and others said they appreciated the extended showcase hours to learn about products and services. “You get to spend more time with the vendors,” Loud said. There also was plenty of opportunity to network with others. “It’s a nice social environment,” Loud said.

At the showcase, I got a chance to see for myself something I just blogged about recently: a new system designed to alert homeowners if their windows are unlocked. It was developed by Honeywell and Andersen Corp., of window fame. John Kovach, Honeywell’s global director of marketing for sensor products, showed me how it works on a window, protecting homes from burglars and also winter drafts.

He also showed me Honeywell’s new 5816OD Wireless Outdoor Contact, which the company says “is the only wireless magnetic contact designed for harsh outdoor environments.” Used with a 5800 Series wireless sensor, it can protect outdoor things like detached garages, barns and other areas too costly to protect with a wired solution. “There’s nothing like this in the industry,” Kovach told me.

Stephen Wheeler, president of Holmes Security Systems, told Kovach he’s trying out the product. Holmes, a Fayetteville, N.C-company founded in 1908, has had four generations of the Wheeler family working for it, Wheeler told me. He said the company has been a First Alert dealer for at least a dozen years. That’s one of the things that stands out for me about this convention—how many Mom-and Pop companies are a part of the First Alert Professional program.

System secures windows from burglars, drafts

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Wednesday, November 2, 2011

I live in Maine, where the fall weather can be up and down—wintry one day, almost balmy the next. On the warm days, I’m likely to yank open a window to make the most of the fresh air before we batten down the house for the winter. But afterwards, I sometimes forget to lock my windows. That’s why an announcement this week of a new system designed to alert homeowners if their windows are unlocked caught my eye. It was developed by Honeywell and Andersen Corp., of window fame, and it seems it would be useful not only for security reasons, but to make sure that your windows are locked up tight against winter drafts. The system works for doors too.

Here’s more from the Oct. 31 release:
 

Honeywell and Andersen Corporation are collaborating to provide a first-of-its-kind system that allows security alarms to alert homeowners if their windows or doors are unlocked. The VeriLock sensor technology embeds Honeywell’s widely used 5800 series of wireless sensors inside the locking mechanisms of a select group of windows and patio doors manufactured by Eagle Window & Door Manufacturing, Inc., a subsidiary of Andersen Corporation.

Similar technology can only detect if a window or door is open or closed. VeriLock sensors are the first that can detect whether they are actually locked or unlocked, in addition to open or closed.

“Statistics show a large number of home invasions are the result of an intruder simply walking in, and not ‘breaking in,’” said John Kovach, Honeywell’s global director of marketing for sensor products. “Whether it’s people rushing out of the house or simply going to bed forgetting to lock up, it’s easy to leave a door or window unlocked and easily accessible. This is the only technology to offer another layer of home protection.”

VeriLock sensors will initially be available on Eagle Axiom casement and awning windows, Talon double-hung windows, and Ascent hinged French patio doors and sliding patio doors. The sensor devices are ideal for single-family homes, multi-unit light commercial dwellings such as assisted-living complexes and remodel projects. In addition to security, VeriLock sensor technology can help reduce home energy use by notifying homeowners when doors and windows are unlocked .

“Windows and doors are a home’s first layer of protection for both comfort and security.  It’s important to make that layer ‘smarter’ for added protection.” said Holly Boehne, senior vice president of Andersen Corporation’s research, development and innovation.

The VeriLock sensor technology is available January 1, 2012 on Eagle products from select Andersen window and door dealers in North America.