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FLIR Systems

I-View Now to integrate with FLIR

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12/12/2014

HENDERSON, Nev.—I-View Now has integrated devices by FLIR Systems Inc., a thermal imaging technology and full-spectrum video security solutions, into the I-View Now platform.

Lead Boston Marathon bombings investigator talks urban security

William Evans explains how training, public-private partnerships, helped mitigate damage, ID suspects
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08/07/2013

BOSTON—When the two bombs exploded at the Boston Marathon finish line in April, there was chaos. Hundreds were seriously injured. Participants and spectators were panicked, not knowing where to turn for safety. Were there more explosive devices set to go off in a few seconds?
Within 22 minutes, chaos was quelled, and the area was secured. How?

Video takes down Boston bombing suspects

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Wednesday, April 24, 2013

Looking back on it, it was a little too close for comfort: Walking the streets of Cambridge at about the same time the Boston Marathon bombers were killing a police officer at MIT, just a few blocks from a nightclub where I was heading with a friend. Investigators had released photos of the suspects a few hours earlier and they were now on the run, with a carjacking, police chase (more on that later) and shootout to follow.

The two men should have known they wouldn’t remain anonymous for long. Given the extent of video surveillance at the bombing site and the number of people taking photos of the race on their cellphones, it was only a matter of time before authorities put the pieces together. Credit for identifying the suspects goes not only to the police and FBI, but also to the technology that made it happen.

The use of that technology extended to the arrest of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, the suspect who fled on foot after surviving the shootout on the night of April 18. Holed up in a shrink-wrapped boat in Watertown, his presence was confirmed by helicopter with the help of thermal-imaging cameras provided by FLIR Systems.

In a black-and-white image that has gone viral since Tsarnaev was taken into custody, his glowing body can be seen through the covering on the boat. Police later sent in an unmanned vehicle to lift the covering, which allowed them to determine that Tsarnaev was not wearing an explosive vest. They soon moved in and apprehended him, ending four days of high anxiety.

My night in Cambridge ended with an improvised escape from town. After leaving the club we found the streets buzzing with dozens of police cruisers, all screaming west toward the shootout in Watertown. Think of the chase scene from “The Blues Brothers” movie—no intersection was safe to cross, even if you had a green light. The main routes out of Cambridge were blocked, so we had to pick our way through a maze of side streets until we found our way home.

What we didn’t know that night was that the MIT slaying and the bombing suspects were connected. That information was confirmed after we made it out of the city, which was soon under lockdown. I'm not sure I would have changed my plans, but I'm obviously glad our paths didn’t cross.
 

FLIR cameras help police find Boston bombing suspect

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04/22/2013

WILSONVILLE, Ore.—A helicopter with infrared cameras from FLIR Systems helped police confirm a Boston Marathon bombing suspect was hiding in a covered boat behind a residence in Watertown, Mass., according to an SIA news item.

ISC West: DMP panels offer ‘more for less’; System Sensor launches combined CO/smoke detector; FLIR aims for infrared cameras in every home

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Wednesday, April 10, 2013

I spent my first morning at ISC West on Tuesday at a rather “unique” forum made up of DMP dealers. The talk there included discussion of the Springfield, Mo.-based manufacturer’s new XR150/350/550 Series access, burglary, and fire panel that the company is showcasing here in Las Vegas.

“We’ve tried to pack as much stuff as we could in this panel,” Rick Britton, DMP CEO and president, told the dealers. He said it’s extremely fast and it’s affordable. “More for less,” he said.

The one-day DMP forum was an owners forum, the second year DMP has held such an event. David Peebles, DMP VP of training and quality, said, “We think the idea is unique”—having DMP executives sit down and discuss ideas with the owners of top DMP dealer companies.

Included in the forum was a presentation by Stanley Oppenheim of New York-based DGA Security Systems, who spoke about how his company weathered Hurricane Sandy. Alan Kruglak of Maryland-based Genesis Security, a security/life safety provider, gave a talk on service contracts and how they can be even more lucrative then monitoring contracts.

In the afternoon, I talked with System Sensor’s director of communications, David George, about the company’s new i4 Series Combination CO/Smoke Detector and Integration Module that it’s launching here at the show.

“The i4 Series is the first low-voltage, system-connected, combination smoke and carbon monoxide detection solution on the market,” according to a company news release. The i4 can be integrated into conventional security and fire panels.

I wrote last spring about a new intelligent combined fire/co detector from Gamewell-FCI by Honeywell. That addressable detector is ideal for large facilities such as hotels, dormitories, apartment buildings, hospitals and nursing homes.

The System Sensor conventional combination CO/smoke solution is the answer for smaller spaces, such as businesses and residences, George told me.

On Tuesday evening, I headed to an event put on by FLIR Systems, an Oregon-based manufacturer of thermal imaging infrared cameras. It makes products that are used in commercial and military applications, but also ones used by consumers, such as hand-held thermal imaging cameras that can be used by recreational boaters or hunters.

Thermal cameras detect images through the heat they emit so can operate in total darkness. The FLIR event was held at the Bali Hai Golf Course, and with the aid of such an infrared device, we could clearly see FLIR employees chasing golf balls on the golf course, even though it was pitch dark out.

And now, with FLIR’s acquisition last year of Lorex Technology, a Toronto-based video surveillance provider, it aims to provide thermal imaging cameras to the home market.

Lorex sells enterprise-grade video products sold through the security channel under the brand name Digimerge; Lorex itself sells video products sold through retail outlets for small businesses and homeowners. The company has hundreds of thousands of customers.

FLIR President Andy Teich said the company’s aim is to offer a low-resolution thermal imaging camera that is affordable to the average homeowner. The cost eventually could perhaps be as low as about $200, said Bill Klink, FLIR VP of business development.

Teich said FLIR’s goal is have infrared technology be “ultimately ubiquitous” in the way that GPS technology is. GPS, he said, answers the question, “Where am I?” and “thermal imaging will tell you what’s out there.

FLIR buys video software company for $46m cash

Deal brings FLIR intellectual property it will use for security applications
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01/09/2013

PORTLAND, Ore.—Thermal camera maker FLIR Systems on Dec. 28 closed a $46 million cash deal for Traficon International, a provider of video imaging software.

FLIR buys Lorex for $59 million

FLIR to deploy 'a lot more cameras,' predicts thermal technology will be common in cameras sold through the channel and in ‘big box’ stores
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10/31/2012

WILSONVILLE, Ore.—With a plan to make thermal technology ubiquitous in enterprise and consumer-grade cameras, FLIR Systems on Oct. 25 agreed to pay $59 million to acquire Lorex Technology, a Toronto-based video surveillance provider.

Security cos. among fastest growing tech businesses

Avigilon ranks No. 4
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11/09/2011

YARMOUTH, Maine—Several companies who are active in the physical security space were listed on the “Deloitte 2011 Technology Fast 500,” released in October.