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lawsuit

TycoIS, ISC lawsuits settled

Integrated Security & Communications opens new office, plans to open at least four more, moves infrastructure to the cloud
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01/22/2014

HAMILTON, N.J.—A lawsuit involving integration giant TycoIS and Integrated Security & Communications over alleged employee poaching and trade secrets stolen has been settled, Michael Thomas, ISC CEO told Security Systems News.

ADS vs. village in lawsuit

After wins in court saying public fire districts in Illinois can’t monopolize monitoring, the industry is fighting a municipality attempting the same thing
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12/31/2013

DES PLAINES, Ill.—The industry is fighting back against an Illinois municipality’s attempt to do an “end around” of a recent court ruling barring public fire districts from monopolizing fire monitoring in the state.

Vision wages legal battle over negative posting on Ripoff Report

The Utah summer-sales company files lawsuit saying it has been defamed, but the site says it’s not responsible for what users post on it
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10/30/2013

OREM, Utah—Vision Security, a summer-sales home security/home automation company here, is suing Ripoff Report, charging that the website is refusing to remove false and defamatory statements about Vision even after the author of the posting has since stated they aren’t true.

Lenel and Mercury Settle

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Tuesday, July 31, 2012

Last summer panel manufacturer Mercury Security filed a lawsuit against Lenel Systems International concerning a contract dispute and alleged copyright infringement. While there was no mention of the lawsuit itself, Mercury and Lenel on July 30 jointly announced a “long-term agreement for access control hardwar

I’ve called both Lenel and Mercury, but have not heard back yet. I understand that both Frank Gasztonyi, co-founder and CTO of Mercury Security, and Steve Wagner, Mercury’s VP of marketing are both, atending an event at Lenel headquarters

The announcement said the agreement is “to provide access control hardware for use with the Lenel OnGuard Total Security Platform.”  

In a statement, Gasztonyi said that Mercury and Lenel “look forward to working together to enhance and improve existing product lines and to provide the industry with new, innovative and highly competitive products into the next decade. After a successful 16-year relationship, we are thrilled to enter into a long-term agreement that allows us to collaborate closely with the industry’s premium access control systems brand.”

Joe Kirmser, president of Lenel, said this in the statement: “Mercury and Lenel have successfully innovated industry-leading security solutions for many years. We are both focused on meeting customer and market needs by jointly developing differentiated solutions.”

ADT runs afoul of California law

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Wednesday, February 1, 2012

ADT has agreed to pay almost $1 million to settle a civil lawsuit brought by the district attorney of California’s Contra Costa County over contracts ADT had with residential customers in which it reserved the right to hike monthly fees after the first year. That violated a California law requiring residential consumers get written disclosure of all costs upfront, according to the state.

District Attorney Mark A. Peterson, who announced the settlement this week, said that under the agreement, ADT has said it will follow the law for future contracts and, in addition to a $950,000 civil fine, will pay restitution to some customers whose monthly rate increased during their initial contract term.

Here’s a more detailed account from the Contra Costa Times on the settlement:

A national alarm company agreed to pay a $950,000 civil penalty and provide restitution to some customers to settle a lawsuit by the Contra Costa District Attorney's Office, which claimed certain contractual terms imposed upon customers violated California law.

District Attorney Mark Peterson announced the settlement Monday with Florida-based ADT Security Services, Inc., which sells home burglar and fire alarm systems.

ADT required customers to enter into two- or three-year contracts, in which the company reserved the right to raise monthly fees after the first year. The lawsuit alleged that by failing to advise customers how much the rate increase would be, ADT violated contract disclosure requirements in California's Unruh Act.

The lawsuit further alleged that termination fees for customers who discontinue ADT service could exceed the remaining balance of a contract obligation.

Under the terms of the settlement, ADT will conform its future California contracts to the requirements of Unruh Act, which requires written disclosure to residential consumers of contract terms. In ADT's case, that includes the total price for monitoring services for the initial term of the contract, disclosure of the number of required payments during that term, and disclosure of the amount of each monthly payment.

Three claims dismissed, but Dice v. Bold continues

Dice attorney says 'meat of the argument' remains in trade case
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01/11/2012

BAY CITY, Mich.—A federal judge has dismissed three claims by Dice Corp. in its trade lawsuit against Bold Technologies, but the move is “just housekeeping” and the legal dispute is far from over, according to an attorney for Dice.