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Open standards lag, but access control to grow to $2.3 billion in 2013

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07/10/2013

AUSTIN, Texas—The drive for open standards in the access control market continues to trail a similar push in video surveillance, potentially limiting growth, but global access-control revenues are still expected to rise from $2.1 billion in 2011 to $2.3 billion by the end of 2013, according to a new report by IMS Research.

Influx of telecoms, cablecos into security not alarming, study says

According to IMS Research, the new players will help boost the home penetration rate very rapidly over the new few years
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06/07/2013

AUSTIN, Texas—The penetration rate for U.S. residential intruder alarm products will increase by 5 to 8 percent during the next three years, aided by the entrance of new telecom and cableco players in the market, according to a recent study from IMS Research, now part of IHS.

IHS: Genetec, Milestone top VMS rankings

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06/05/2013

LONDON—Since 2004, the first year of IHS’ VMS rankings, Copenhagen-based Milestone has had a monopoly on the top spot. Nine years later, the company still has the top spot, but it now has to share it with Genetec, a Montreal-based vendor.

New Firetide CEO sees mesh networks on the move

Cisco vet John McCool joins Firetide, sees promise for growth as surveillance moves beyond 'the curb'
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05/29/2013

LOS GATOS, Calif.— Cisco veteran John McCool, who joined mesh network provider Firetide as its new CEO on May 20, says there’s an increasing demand to take surveillance mobile.

IMS: Demand for mass notification systems expected to soar

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05/24/2013

LONDON—In the wake of the Boston Marathon bombing and the ensuing manhunt, as well as the Sandy Hook massacre, governments, schools and other organizations are turning to mass notification systems to protect public safety, which is expected to fuel a 30 percent spike in demand for the North American market, according to IMS Research, now part of IHS.

IMS: Boston bombing likely to boost video surveillance spending

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05/08/2013

WELLINGBOROUGH, England—The Boston Marathon bombing will likely drive increased spending on video surveillance equipment, a market that had already been projected to more than double through 2016, according to IMS Research.

Video surveillance after Boston: Carte blanche for Big Brother?

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Wednesday, May 1, 2013

There has been a lot of debate in the past few months about the government infringing on the privacy and rights of its citizens. Most of the heat has been generated by the standoff over gun control, but you don’t have to look far to find people who think Big Brother is lurking around every corner—at the IRS, DHS and even your local cop shop.

So what about video surveillance? Did the fact that video helped take down the Boston bombers give the powers-that-be carte blanche to watch your every move, whenever and wherever you go? Will there soon be blanket surveillance every time you step out your door? And if that’s the case, where is the outrage and pushback?

Apparently there won’t be any. In a poll taken after the Boston bombing, The New York Times and CBS News found that 78 percent of Americans favor installing video surveillance cameras in public places, judging that any infringement on their privacy is worth it to help prevent terrorist attacks.

That sentiment bodes well for the security industry, which stands to profit from the increased public and private spending. Even before the bombing, IMS Research was projecting a 114 percent increase in the global market for video surveillance equipment, from $9.6 billion in 2010 to $20.5 billion in 2016. IMS is in the process of revising that forecast, no doubt making it even rosier.

Which brings us to drones (or maybe not, but that’s where I’m going). Last week, Boston Police Commissioner Edward Davis said he would be interested in using aerial surveillance technology to monitor events like the Boston Marathon. He wasn’t talking about helicopters—the price of drones has gotten to the point where local police departments are using them, particularly in rural areas.

The security industry might be able to benefit from that development too. The question is, when will the privacy line be crossed in the minds of the public? You might feel safer knowing that your bank or train station is under surveillance, but how will you feel when a police drone flies over your house? Or am I being paranoid?

It will be interesting to see what happens on that front. For now, though, protection has trumped the freedom to remain anonymous, at least when it comes to surveillance on the ground. The Tsarnaev brothers can attest to that.

Boston Marathon bombing could accelerate video surveillance spending

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04/30/2013

WELLINGBOROUGH, U.K.—In the aftermath of the Boston bombings, spending on video surveillance equipment may experience a spike that augments already lofty expectations for the market, according to a statement from IMS Research, a market research firm based here.

Proprietary ‘smart home’ systems losing ground to open standards

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03/06/2013

Annual shipments of proprietary wireless technologies for home automation are expected to double by 2017, but proportionately their deployment in “smart homes” will be cut in half as service providers including ADT and AT&T drive a move toward open standards, according to a new report by IMS Research.

Limited awareness remains growth inhibitor for PSIM market

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02/06/2013

The world market for PSIM software is estimated to have more than doubled between 2009 and 2011, but limited awareness tempered revenue projections for 2012 and continues to do so for 2013, according to a new report from IMS Research.

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