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Keith Jentoft

PPVAR panels at ISC West merit a close look

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Wednesday, March 19, 2014

For anyone monitoring the progress of the latest push toward a comprehensive verified alarm standard, there’s a pair of consecutive PPVAR panel sessions at ISC West that are can’t-miss in stature.

The first session, moderated by Steve Walker, vice president of Stanley Convergent, kicks off on Thursday, April 3 in Room 502, and is especially noteworthy because it brings several outside-the-industry perspectives into the same forum. Titled “Insurance and Law Enforcement Review Verified Alarms,” the session illustrates the array of stakeholder groups now influencing the conversation of verification. Among the six panelists are Cmdr. Scott Edson, Los Angeles Sheriff’s Dept., and Anthony Canale, vice president of Verisk Crime Analytics.

The second panel, “Video Verification in the Alarm Industry,” is moderated by Donald Young, PPVAR president and chief information officer at Protection 1. The panel roster for this second discussion is designed to showcase a broad array of intra-industry views on the role of video verification in the alarm industry. Keith Jentoft, an industry liaison for PPVAR, said the lineup will feature representatives from the manufacturing side (Scott Harkins, president of Honeywell) and the central station space (Chuck Moeling, executive VP of sales at Interface, and Tony Wilson, president of CMS), along with representatives from the private investment and legal arenas.

The debate surrounding verified alarms is a fascinating one, and that’s due in part to the general complexity of an issue that involves stakeholders from outside the industry, as well as a host of ideas about the role of verified alarms that dovetail as much as they diverge.

I expect these discussions to generate some high-quality dialog that not only zooms into the subtleties and particulars of verified alarms, but also pans out to ask the big, overarching questions about the role of the industry in general. As the industry evolves, what aspects of the alarm industry as we know it will remain in place? What’s bound to change? What qualifies as a verified alarm, and where do legacy systems fit into the discussion?

These questions may not be asked explicitly, but I expect them to permeate the discussion.  

Digital Life, Imperial Capital join PPVAR

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Wednesday, January 15, 2014

Several organizations recently joined PPVAR’s growing membership roster, but two of the new additions are particularly striking. Digital Life, a home management platform from AT&T, is now on board, according to Keith Jentoft, an industry liaison for PPVAR. This comes about seven months after Digital Life earned CSAA Five Diamond certification.

Investment bank Imperial Capital also joined the organization. This is doubtless an interesting development as well, with Imperial being the organization's first member from the private investment side. In a certain sense, an investment bank showing interest in video verified monitoring seems unsurprising, given signs of the technology's more mainstream direction, plus the technology’s ability to drive higher average revenue returns per customer. Additionally, when a private investment bank allies itself with a best-practices organization, it suggests their interest in the value proposition runs fairly deep.

The group also added The Illinois Alarm Association and the Michigan Association of Police Chiefs as members—both organizations the likes of which we've become more accustomed to seeing engage with PPVAR, an organization focused on pooling knowledge from members in both public and private sectors.

As PPVAR forges ahead toward its goal of written standards for video verification, I’ll be keen to see what kind of bearings its new members have on the organization’s direction. Will the addition of Digital Life compel other cablecos and telecoms to join? And with respect to Imperial Capital, I’m curious to see what kind of role they play in promoting PPVAR’s cause. Will their membership generate further interest in video verification from other private investment groups?

The organization is convening in the coming days, Jentoft said. After they do, I hope to get a clearer picture of where the organization is at this stage of the process.

PPVAR goal: video verification standards ready by June 2014

Law enforcement teams works with alarm industry to ‘shape video alarm response before it becomes widespread’
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11/26/2013

HENDERSON, Nev.—With the goal of having a set of video verification standards in place by June 2014, a group of law enforcement and alarm industry representatives gathered for the first time to hash out the best-practices for video alarm response.

Telguard, Videofied team up on video verified platform

Telguard will private label Videofied’s video verification product
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11/20/2013

NEW YORK—Telguard and Videofied have formed an original equipment manufacturer partnership that the companies hope will accelerate the adoption of video verified alarms.

Video verification a priority for new CSAA president Hauhn

Jay Hauhn wants PPVAR to be a CSAA standing committee; ASAP program also a priority
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10/30/2013

VIENNA, Va.—Establishing the Partnership for Priority Video Alarm Response as a standing committee within the Central Station Alarm Association will be a top priority for recently elected CSAA President Jay Hauhn.

Video verification goes mainstream

Honeywell, a PPVAR platinum associate member, will begin manufacturing video-verified intrusion alarms
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09/04/2013

HENDERSON, N.V.—In a move that some believe may spur broader mainstream adoption of video verified alarms, Honeywell Security has joined the Partnership for Priority Video Alarm Response as a platinum associate member, according to a statement from PPVAR.

Honeywell joins PPVAR

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Tuesday, August 27, 2013

Over the weekend, the Partnership for Priority Video Alarm Response, a public-private partnership comprising stakeholders in property crime, announced the addition of a major manufacturer to its membership ranks. The company? Honeywell Security.

After speaking with some in the industry involved with PPVAR, including Keith Jentoft, president of Videofied and RSI Video Technologies, it is increasingly clear to me why this carries major implications for the future of video monitored alarm systems. A recurring theme I’m hearing is that Honeywell’s decision to come on board with PPVAR reflects significant progress toward “mainstreaming” such systems.

In a PPVAR statement, Donald Young, president of PPVAR and chief information officer at Protection 1, said the following: “Honeywell will help us in our efforts to strengthen our partnerships with law enforcement using monitored video alarm as a mainstream solution.” In the same statement, Scott Harkins, president of Honeywell Security Products Americas, stated: “Honeywell is pleased that the PPVAR supports continued police response to all burglar alarms. We also recognize that video verification is an important product category as we look to the future of security.”

If you synthesize these two statements, PPVAR’s message becomes clear. The organization encourages the mainstream adoption of video verification alarm systems in both commercial and residential settings, since this appears to be the trajectory monitored alarms are on. But what’s also apparent in the statement, particularly through Harkins’ quote, is that both the organization and its members remain firmly positioned as allies of the monitored alarm industry and its stakeholders in general—whether we’re talking about video monitored alarm systems or traditional ones. PPVAR's emphasis is on priority response. 

With monitored video alarm systems becoming more affordable, it may only be a matter of time before video verified alarm systems reach a tipping point in their adoption. It’s a development that some in the industry, as well as in law enforcement, will hail—especially as municipalities across the country continue to search for ways to mitigate false alarms.

Honeywell’s membership status with PPVAR only helps advance the industry closer to that adoption tipping point. On that front it is a major illustration of progress. Equally instrumental for achieving broader adoption, however, could be PPVAR’s positioning itself not as a threat to the existing, largely non-video installer base, but as an ally. 

IESA to discuss video verification

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04/26/2013

ARLINGTON HEIGHTS, Ill.—Video verification will be the focal point of a May 15 meeting of the Illinois Electronic Security Association, according to a statement from the organization, based here.

Videofied makes ‘mainstream’ move

Company looks to expand indoor video verification with distribution deal
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03/26/2013

VADNAIS HEIGHTS, Minn.—Videofied has made what President Keith Jentoft calls “a big move” to bring indoor video verification into the mainstream, partnering with an independent distributor for the first time to expand the company’s reach in the United States and Canada.

Clerk’s death brings call for mandatory video surveillance

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Tuesday, November 20, 2012

City-mandated video surveillance? It’s on the table in Pine Bluff, Ark.

In the wake of the unsolved killing of a convenience store clerk, local leaders are considering an ordinance to require convenience stores and restaurants to install and maintain surveillance cameras on their properties, the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette reported on Nov. 12.

The move was prompted by the shooting death of Mohammad Islam during an attempted robbery Sept. 25 at the Big Red Food Mart. The shooter has not been apprehended, a situation that police investigators say has not been helped by the fact that security cameras inside the store were not working at the time of the crime.

“What we want to ensure is the safety of people working in these stores,” said Alderman George Stepps, who sponsored the ordinance. “That’s the bottom line here.”

Fines of up to $1,000 could be assessed against storeowners, managers or clerks at properties found in noncompliance. The city’s Fire and Emergency Services Department would inspect properties and ensure that cameras are operational.

According to the Democrat-Gazette, Pine Bluff—population 49,083—could be the first city of its size in the state to have such an ordinance.

Capt. Greg Shapiro of the Pine Bluff Police Department told the newspaper that the department supports the proposal and sees it as a crime deterrent.

“We asked for this piece of legislation following [Islam’s] murder,” Shapiro said. “We don’t want to place a financial burden on any business, but this is 2012, and the technology is available and affordable to protect employees [of these businesses] and help us deter, as well as solve, crimes.”

Keith Jentoft, president of RSI Video Technologies, said the proposed ordinance is a sign of the times: using technology to fight crime instead of throwing declining law enforcement personnel against it.

“What I find fascinating is that the motivation is not to reduce false alarms, but to make arrests,” Jentoft told Security Systems News. He said Pine Bluff’s ordinance and similar legislation can help the alarm industry “upsell an entire community of businesses so that their alarm systems can do a better job of protecting people.”

The Pine Bluff City Council on Monday night postponed a vote on the proposal.

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