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System Sensor offers low frequency notification guide

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09/04/2014

ST. CHARLES, Ill.—System Sensor’s low frequency notification application guide—which provides information on low frequency fire and carbon monoxide notification appliance requirements—is now available.

Five Questions: Lynde Bailey

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07/01/2014

Lynde Bailey is the new Midwest regional sales manager for SDI Specialized Fire Products, a New Jersey-based fire company that specializes in fire and security testing solutions. She has more than 10 years experience in the fire alarm industry. In her new position, she is charged with spearheading expansion and growth in the market and she also will play a key role in developing innovative industry initiatives and offerings from SDI. Security Systems News caught up with Lynde in May and asked her five questions:

Wireless touted at NFPA show

Remote testing devices and FAAST that goes further were also among new offerings
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06/16/2014

LAS VEGAS— New developments when it comes to wireless fire solutions and aspirating smoke detectors were among offerings being touted at the annual NFPA Conference & Expo, held here June 9-12.

CO restaurant death leads to new laws, but can industry do more?

A fire company president calls for digital displays of CO levels on system-connected detectors, but a manufacturer says other safeguards are already in place
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05/21/2014

CENTEREACH, N.Y.—The death of a Long Island, N.Y. restaurant manager from carbon monoxide poisoning has prompted several Long Island communities to pass new CO requirements.

Low frequency fire appliances more audible, meet new code

Hotels and other commercial sleeping places must now have such devices to help alert heavy sleepers and the hearing impaired of a fire
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04/29/2014

LAS VEGAS—When a fire alarm activates during a fire, the high-frequency sound it emits can be insufficient to alert some hearing impaired individuals or even just sound sleepers. But System Sensor has some new low frequency notification appliances that address that problem because they’re easier for such people to hear, according to David George, the company’s director of marketing communications.

North Carolina may pass CO legislation after hotel poisonings

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07/10/2013

ST. CHARLES, Ill.—Several recent deaths caused by carbon monoxide poisoning in a North Carolina hotel room may lead to a law in that state requiring CO detectors in lodging places.

North Carolina hotel room a CO deathtrap?

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Wednesday, June 12, 2013

North Carolina requires carbon monoxide detectors in homes and apartments, but not in hotels. Now, some tragic deaths in a hotel room in Boone, N.C. make a compelling argument for a CO detector mandate for hotels.

First, an elderly couple died in April in room 225 in the Best Western Plus Blue Ridge Plaza, according to news reports. Then, on Saturday, an 11-year-old boy was found dead in the same room, reports say.

Blood tests show that the April deaths were due to CO poisoning, according to TIME Magazine.

Next to die, on June 8, was the young boy, Jeffrey Lee Williams. “The cause of death was determined to be asphyxia, meaning his lungs couldn’t get enough oxygen,” TIME reported June 9. “Williams, from Rock Hill, S.C., died spontaneously, and his 49-year-old mother was hospitalized in critical condition — circumstances strangely similar to that of Daryl Dean Jenkins, 73, and Shirley Mae Jenkins, 72, from Longview, Wash., who were found dead in the same room on April 16.”

It has not yet been established if CO poisoning caused the boy to die and his mother to become ill, news reports said. But TIME said that an initial test taken the day the boy died “showed a high amount of poisonous gas in the room.” A toxicology analysis is pending, the magazine said.

The report says police didn’t explain why it took two months to get toxicology results on what caused the Jenkins to die. Earlier results, the magazine said,  “could have led to the closing of the hotel long before Williams’ death.”

The magazine added, “Room 225 is directly above the room housing a natural gas heater for the hotel’s swimming pool. Documents obtained by the Charlotte Observer show a Watauga County Health Department report indicating deficiencies in the pool.”

According to an NBC report, the independently owned and operated hotel released a statement saying, “The health and safety of guests who stay at our hotel is our No. 1 priority. Our thoughts and prayers go out to the family and friends of those involved. We are cooperating fully with authorities who are investigating this truly tragic incident.”

According to a new interactive map of CO legislation in the United States developed by System Sensor, North Carolina’s law requiring CO detectors in homes and multi-family dwellings took effect Jan. 1, 2010. System Sensor, based in St. Charles, Ill., makes fire detection and notification devices, including carbon monoxide detectors.

New CO laws lead to more detector demand

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05/17/2013

ST. CHARLES, Ill.—A new Washington state law that went into effect Jan. 1 mandates carbon monoxide detectors in new single-family homes and all new and existing apartments and rental houses.

ISC West: DMP panels offer ‘more for less’; System Sensor launches combined CO/smoke detector; FLIR aims for infrared cameras in every home

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Wednesday, April 10, 2013

I spent my first morning at ISC West on Tuesday at a rather “unique” forum made up of DMP dealers. The talk there included discussion of the Springfield, Mo.-based manufacturer’s new XR150/350/550 Series access, burglary, and fire panel that the company is showcasing here in Las Vegas.

“We’ve tried to pack as much stuff as we could in this panel,” Rick Britton, DMP CEO and president, told the dealers. He said it’s extremely fast and it’s affordable. “More for less,” he said.

The one-day DMP forum was an owners forum, the second year DMP has held such an event. David Peebles, DMP VP of training and quality, said, “We think the idea is unique”—having DMP executives sit down and discuss ideas with the owners of top DMP dealer companies.

Included in the forum was a presentation by Stanley Oppenheim of New York-based DGA Security Systems, who spoke about how his company weathered Hurricane Sandy. Alan Kruglak of Maryland-based Genesis Security, a security/life safety provider, gave a talk on service contracts and how they can be even more lucrative then monitoring contracts.

In the afternoon, I talked with System Sensor’s director of communications, David George, about the company’s new i4 Series Combination CO/Smoke Detector and Integration Module that it’s launching here at the show.

“The i4 Series is the first low-voltage, system-connected, combination smoke and carbon monoxide detection solution on the market,” according to a company news release. The i4 can be integrated into conventional security and fire panels.

I wrote last spring about a new intelligent combined fire/co detector from Gamewell-FCI by Honeywell. That addressable detector is ideal for large facilities such as hotels, dormitories, apartment buildings, hospitals and nursing homes.

The System Sensor conventional combination CO/smoke solution is the answer for smaller spaces, such as businesses and residences, George told me.

On Tuesday evening, I headed to an event put on by FLIR Systems, an Oregon-based manufacturer of thermal imaging infrared cameras. It makes products that are used in commercial and military applications, but also ones used by consumers, such as hand-held thermal imaging cameras that can be used by recreational boaters or hunters.

Thermal cameras detect images through the heat they emit so can operate in total darkness. The FLIR event was held at the Bali Hai Golf Course, and with the aid of such an infrared device, we could clearly see FLIR employees chasing golf balls on the golf course, even though it was pitch dark out.

And now, with FLIR’s acquisition last year of Lorex Technology, a Toronto-based video surveillance provider, it aims to provide thermal imaging cameras to the home market.

Lorex sells enterprise-grade video products sold through the security channel under the brand name Digimerge; Lorex itself sells video products sold through retail outlets for small businesses and homeowners. The company has hundreds of thousands of customers.

FLIR President Andy Teich said the company’s aim is to offer a low-resolution thermal imaging camera that is affordable to the average homeowner. The cost eventually could perhaps be as low as about $200, said Bill Klink, FLIR VP of business development.

Teich said FLIR’s goal is have infrared technology be “ultimately ubiquitous” in the way that GPS technology is. GPS, he said, answers the question, “Where am I?” and “thermal imaging will tell you what’s out there.

Honeywell names new fire leader

Gary Lederer will head a new umbrella organization, Honeywell Life Safety (HLS) Fire Solutions, Americas
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02/20/2013

NORTHFORD, Conn.—Honeywell announced this week that it has created a new umbrella organization, Honeywell Life Safety (HLS) Fire Solutions, Americas, under which Honeywell Fire Systems and System Sensor will work more closely together.

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