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Carter Brothers to build new security business with new partner

After selling its fire business to Tyco, Carter looks to collaborate with a cableco or telecom

ATLANTA—Now that he’s sold his fire business to Tyco, John Carter, president of Carter Brothers, plans to partner with a large company to provide security services on a national basis.

Vivint latest big player to go ASAP

Company hopes to encourage more PSAPs

PROVO, Utah—Vivint in late September started planning its ASAP to PSAP adoption.

ADT goes live with ASAP

Other large nationals expected to follow suit

BOCA RATON, Fla.—ADT has joined the ASAP to PSAP program, which will cause a positive chain reaction for the program, increasing its prevalence nationwide, according to Jay Hauhn, CSAA executive director.

Deceptive sales practices knocked at ESX

Solicited Baltimore residents share their stories

BALTIMORE—Diane Pruitt, a resident here, recently had two young men knock on her door, lie to her about her security system and which company they were from, and persistently tried to sell her a different system.

Hear it from this Millennial

Wednesday, July 8, 2015

More and more I’m hearing about the “Millennials;” those born between 1980 and 2000. I fit squarely in that range.

Millennials seem to be the target audience for home automation, some have noted them as the more “technological-savvy” generation. Now, the Millennials are entering the job market. At this year’s ESX I heard UCC’s Mike Lamb, and ADT’s Stephen Smith, share their observations on training this younger generation.  

During Lamb and Smith’s ESX Panel, “Training for Central Station Operators,” I was—as a Millenial—quite alert, asking myself how each technique or perspective applied to me.  

There were quite a few points that I could agree with and—imagining myself in the shoes of a prospective central station operator—would see a lot of value in. Though, there were other points where I differed in opinion.

Lamb said that Millenials like understanding the value in their work. That is certainly something I could agree with, and I don’t think Millenials are the only ones who could benefit from better grasping the value behind what they do.

Also, he had a point that, when given a task, Millenials might be more prone to ask “Why?” This isn’t a sign of disrespect, he said, but instead looking for more understanding.

I definitely agree with that. Approaching a task, I find it very useful to understand where my role or any action plays into the larger plan.

Lamb pointed out that Generation Y is the age of “participation trophies,” which, unfortunately, I can’t disagree with. Lamb had a point that this constant recognition given to many individuals in Generation Y is something to notice and enable in your central station employees; that they like to be recognized if and when they are doing things right. I can see how a little positive reinforcement would encourage confidence in a new employee. Though, I personally wouldn’t want to see this overdone, certainly not to the levels of participation trophies.

Lamb also had a point that younger generations occasionally struggle with professionalism, specifically in writing. An example he gave was with “twitter speak,” using “u” instead of “you,” “r” in place of “are” and so forth. This surprised me the most. Perhaps it is my writing experience separating me from the Generation Y pool of potential operators, but I have always found a professional writing style to be imperative. Lamb, and some of the attendees, said this is a problem of the generation.

UCC, ADT talk on training Millennials

ESX panel focuses on new central station operators

BALTIMORE—Underlining the important work that central station operators do is key when training Millennials who are now entering the workforce and the security industry, according to panelists at ESX.

ADT’s new partnerships ‘push the boundary’

LG, Nest give ADT broader reach

BOCA RATON, Fla.—ADT’s recent partnership with LG Electronics and Google’s Nest is the company’s means to “push the boundary” between residential security and home automation with the goal of extending “protection and security to as many people as we can,” according to ADT chief innovation officer Arthur Orduña.

Five Questions: Jeff Auman


Jeff Auman is vice president of residential sales for ADT. Before joining the company last November he held a number of leadership positions at Sprint, most recently as vice president, product operations.

Ex-ADT exec kick-starts Abode

Home security company exceeds fundraising goal

PALO ALTO, Calif.—A former ADT executive’s Kickstarter campaign to help finance a new DIY home security company exceeded its $100,000 goal, and the company, Abode, is up and running.

Got design in mind?

Wednesday, May 20, 2015

You’ve heard the old real estate sales mantra: “Location, location, location.” For many in the residential security industry today, the new mantra is “Design, design, design.” 

At ISC West this year I met with a long list of security pros, from manufacturers to dealers to providers, most of whom proclaimed that on top of tech advancements their equipment was made “to look good.” 

They’re right. Their designs are looking good.

Panels, switches, sensors and more are sleek with a European-design feel. They will be less than obtrusive when mounted on a wall. No more huge black or brown boxes in the front foyer—these blend in. 

The equipment, mostly white and thin, reminded me of the first, very early, iBook I owned. So pretty and neat, small and clean. That was a number of years ago, and my iBook eventually met its demise, but I still remember it fondly, mostly for how it looked in comparison to other bulky laptops of the day. 

“This is the year of industrial design,” Avi Rosenthal, board member of the Z-Wave Alliance and VP of security and control for Nortek, told me early on at the Las Vegas show.  His comments resonated as I visited other booths after that. 

For homeowners, form is equally as important as function for all products, he and others said.

“It’s the ‘wife-acceptance’ factor. She’s the one who decorates, so the devices must look cool on the wall,” Rosenthal said.

Who wants something big, dark and ugly hitched to the wall just inside their front door? Not me. Neither did former ADT exec Christopher Carney when deciding on the look of his new Abode home resi system.

The pursuit of aesthecially pleasing design extended into the ISC West booths themselves this year. Honeywell, for example, had all of its products—from fire to resi—on interactive display in one big, nicely appointed space—think of an Apple store. 

Nortek had a new, interactive booth, too, with each of its sister companies representing myriad slick-looking products. 

How big a deal is this whole aesthetics thing to you and your companies? Are you feeling the need to adapt to the latest trends in home décor? Are you hearing this from your customers? 

If your products are less than pretty, you might want to consider how good design might add to your bottom line.