Subscribe to RSS - ADT

ADT

Carter Brothers to build new security business with new partner

After selling its fire business to Tyco, Carter looks to collaborate with a cableco or telecom
 - 
10/31/2012

ATLANTA—Now that he’s sold his fire business to Tyco, John Carter, president of Carter Brothers, plans to partner with a large company to provide security services on a national basis.

Former ADT finance director wants to kick-start home security company

 - 
Wednesday, March 25, 2015

Christopher Carney, a former director of finance M&A and director of finance, sales and marketing for ADT, has launched a Kickstarter campaign for his new company, Abode Systems.

The 45-day campaign aims to raise $100,000 by May 7 to bring the “new kind of home security and automation solution to market,” Carney said in a prepared statement. The solution “will put big security companies on notice,” he said.

Carney co-founded Abode, based in Palo Alto, Calif., with Brent Franks, previously an account executive with salesforce.com and EVP and co-founder of TerraSmart, a turnkey solar ground mount provider.

The DIY Abode system puts the customer in charge by allowing them to customize, he said.

"My last decade in home security showed me that big security companies have serious flaws and don't consider the changing lifestyles of today's consumers or accommodate new technologies and devices coming to market," CEO Carney said.  “When developing Abode, we had a vision for a self-installable security system that grows with you and your evolving needs, while also remaining capable of utilizing new technologies next month, next year, or further down the road."

Carney said the system offers portability in that it can be transferred to a new home with no reinstallation costs; it eliminates false alarms by sending real-time visual verification and, through its built-in body analysis technology, by being able to tell the difference between people and animals; has a built-in backup power and a 3G radio for use when Internet connections are lost; provides home automation capabilities at no extra cost; can be controlled through a web portal and mobile app; and has an optional 24-hour monitoring available.

The system includes the Abode gateway, motion camera, streaming camera, door and window sensors and key fob.

ADT releases mobile PERS

Product allows seniors—and others—peace of mind away from home, company says
 - 
03/20/2015

BOCA RATON, Fla.—ADT has added a wearable, mobile PERS device to its health product portfolio.

APT to rename itself after a tree in April

 - 
Wednesday, March 11, 2015

SALT LAKE CITY—Alarm Protection Technology, also variously known as Alarm Protection and APT, will change its name next month to Alder.

On the heels of a big court win against resi giant ADT, which sued APT for trademark infringement and deceptive and fraudulent sales practices, APT told Security Systems News that a rebranding is in the works.

Before the ADT vs. APT case went to trial in February, a federal judge had issued a preliminary injunction preventing Alarm Protection Technology from using its APT acronym. So the company temporarily dropped the “T” and went by Alarm Protection, according to the company’s general legal counsel, Adam Christian.

The company could go back to using its full name now that it has won its case, Christian said, but is opting instead to go with Alder.

“Alder, comes from alder tree. We like the symbol of the tree. It’s a tree of protection, a tree of opportunity and it reflects family as well,” Christian said.

It also reflects the company’s future expected growth and expansion of services, he said, declining to comment specifically on what that service expansion will include.

“There will be other services that are closely aligned with protection and our interests,” he said.

 

 

APT wins against ADT

Jury finds no evidence of trademark infringement, fraudulent sales practices
 - 
03/11/2015

SALT LAKE CITY—Alarm Protection Technology (APT) is the victor in its legal battle with residential security giant ADT.

ADT puts muscle, aka Ving Rhames, into ad campaign

 - 
Wednesday, February 18, 2015

BOCA RATON, Fla.—He had commanding roles in “Pulp Fiction” and “Mission Impossible” and starred in HBO’s “Don King: Only in America.” Now award-winning actor Ving Rhames is putting his tough-guy persona and deep voice to work for ADT.

Well, wait a sec. According to Rhames, he’s not just working for the huge home security firm; he says in the new commercials that he “is ADT.”

The ad campaign seeks to set ADT apart from the increasing number of smart home products available to consumers. The spots are based on the premise that consumers often mistake convenience “with the added safety of professionally monitored security,” ADT said in a prepared statement.

In the ads, Rhames asks, “What good is a smart home if it’s not a safe home?”

“Our new campaign addresses the desire for connectivity, control and most important of all—security. Self-monitored security solutions do not provide police, fire or emergency medical response in the event of an emergency,” Jerri DeVard, chief marketing officer of ADT, said in the statement.

Rhames says in one of the spots I viewed: “Strong isn’t wrong, I’m ADT, I oughta know. But what makes brawn even better is brains. See, I’m both the big brain at the center of your peace of mind and the big muscle to keep the peace.”

Big brain, big muscle, gotcha. I'm not going to argue with Mr. Ving. Good ad campaign, I think. What do you think?

Defender’s Boyce promoted to CEO

Continued growth, philanthropy, training his main aims
 - 
01/28/2015

INDIANAPOLIS—Jim Boyce has been promoted from president to president and CEO of Defender, a provider of residential security and home automation services and the largest ADT dealer in the country.

SentryNet offering classes on taking on large nationals

Preparing dealers to go ‘toe-to-toe with ADT’
 - 
01/07/2015

RICHLAND, Miss.—SentryNet, a third-party monitoring station with locations in Tennessee and Florida, started a series of classes in December designed to teach its dealers how to compete with the likes of ADT, Vivint and other national companies.

ADT and Google-Nest? No big 'surprise'

 - 
Wednesday, January 7, 2015

ADT CEO Naren Gursahaney announced during an interview with Forbes magazine last month that ADT is “working feverishly to develop” a partnership with Google-Nest.

Despite that pronouncement in the national magazine, ADT since has been mum on the potential partnership. It told Security Systems News and other publications that basically, at any given time, it is in regular conversations with a number of tech companies about potential partnerships.

There is nothing to report at this time, an ADT spokeswoman said via email in response to an inquiries from SSN after the Fortune article appeared and then again on Jan. 6.

But Imperial Capital, in a report released Dec. 30, said an ADT-Nest partnership is “not a surprise … especially since Nest has been running its ‘work with Nest’ developer program for connecting its products with other smart-products with some of the same companies as ADT."

“Mercedes Benz, Jawbone, Whirlpool, Logitech and IFTTT are among the growing list of companies with which Nest is integrating. ADT is now working with many ‘new-age,’ cloud based technology companies—several of them overlapping with Nest. ADT needs to show investors that it has the full range of technology and services capabilities ranging from experts in installing the plain old telephone line (POTS) systems, to installers and servicers who have the ‘IT-IQ’ to make ADT into a technology leader in the residential alarm monitoring industry.”

A partnership between ADT and Nest “could open up a significant opportunity for ADT to provide professional monitoring for [Nest’s] Dropcam users (and potentially other DIY products in the coming quarters,” Imperial said in the report.

 

 

Jay Hauhn retires

 - 
Monday, November 24, 2014

This week is the first week in 37 years that Jay Hauhn is not reporting to work at Tyco (or former sister company ADT). Hauhn's last day was on Friday. I had a chance to catch up with Jay last week at ISC East.

Jay said he's looking forward to taking the next 6 to 12 months to "decompress" from the day-to-day corporate world. But he'll stay connected to the security industry in a volunteer capacity: Hauhn serves as president of the Central Station Alarm Association, and he's also looking forward to "re-engaging with SIA [in some volunteer capacity.]"

Jay began his career with a temporary job at ADT as a "key runner," where he literally carried a metal keybox to businesses when there was an alarm. After six months, he moved to an engineering position where he worked on the "very beginnings of computerization of central stations." He later worked in the World Trade Center in New York where did further work with ADT central stations (There were 165 at the time; today there are fewer than five.)

In the course of his career, Hauhn has worked on the systems integration side of the business, has been responsible for products, and has worked as CTO.

Asked about the most important technological change he witnessed in his career? The digital dialer, he said. "The digital dailer created the residential businesses' ability to cost effectively protect homes. That was a paradigm shift," he said. Many security companies are about 70 percent residential, he noted. "[The digital dailer] led to the growth in this industry."

More recently, an important technological advancement has been managed services and in particular hosted access. Where previously a security company that did card access and video "was lucky to get a maintenance contract," hosted access changed that.

"Steve Van Till [Brivo CEO] did this," Hauhn said. "He showed this industry how to sell card access and get RMR out of every sale."

The industry is not there yet with hosted video, he said.

Hauhn said he's a huge believer that workable video analytics will be the key to hosted video.

"That's where managed video is going to finally get traction," he said. Then, only important snippets of video will be sent to the cloud.

Then that video data will be mined. "It will be more about business operation improvement as opposed to security. That's where the ROI [for end users] would be—in improved business metrics."

I asked him about the most fun stuff he's done working in the security industry.

Hauhn spent some time in the late 80s and early 90s working for ADT's federal group. "I got to design security systems for some places that don't exist," he said. "I'm still not allowed to talk about those, but to go to those federal DoD locations and know the importance of those places, and I got to design the security systems to protect them. That was neat," he said.

Hauhn also really liked some work he did with the Navy SEALS. He declined to elaborate beyond: "I got to play with some of their toys—boats and vehicles. That was fun."

Hauhn said he may do some consulting after a year or so, but he also may decide not to.

"Tyco and ADT have been very good to me," he said. "I know it sounds corny, but I've really met some fantastic people in this industry," he said. "There's a lot of cameraderie and people care about what they do—protecting assets and property."

 

 

Pages