Subscribe to RSS - central station alarm monitoring

central station alarm monitoring

Security Partners to train dealers in managed video

With 40 percent growth in its video monitoring customer base, Security Partners now working with CheckVideo on new training program for video verification, video hosting and guard services
 - 
09/17/2014

LANCASTER, Pa.—Nearly two years after launching its advanced services division, Security Partners, a wholesale monitoring company based here, is partnering with CheckVideo to help drive managed video sales.

Dynamark, Videofied form partnership

 - 
Wednesday, August 6, 2014

Dynamark's adoption of Videofied is a further sign the company’s monitoring aspect, more than three years into its renaissance, is continuing to cement its presence in the central station space.  

The company is offering dealers video verification alarms through Videofied’s platform, allowing them to purchase and install the service through Dynamark’s product division, or add the platform to existing installations. The latter alternative will be welcome news to dealers, who have the opportunity to upgrade existing customers drawn to video verification.

In a news release, Dynamark president and CEO Trey Alter said both the product and the monitoring are available to the dealer through the same program. “This makes tech support and sales support virtually seamless, and that makes life easier and more profitable for our dealers,” Alter said in a prepared statement.

Dynamark Monitoring, launched in 2011, last year acquired Dayton, Ohio-based Security Services Center, which brought 40 alarm companies scattered across Ohio, Indiana and Kentucky into its dealer network.

Later in 2013, the company also launched its partner program, a newly created unit led by Hank Groff, SVP of sales, designed to propel the company from a regional to a national player.

In the coming days I plan to get the skinny on the company’s new video verification effort, and to hear what else might be in store for the resurgent Hagerstown, Md.-based central.

Monitoring everything

‘The Internet of Things’ brings opportunities for non-traditional monitoring
 - 
08/04/2014

“The Internet of Things,” the ever-increasing number of devices that are connected to the Internet, may represent a new frontier in monitoring. As the number of connected products rises, so do the revenue and service opportunities for security dealers to monitor those devices.

COPS Monitoring wins CSAA central station of the year award

 - 
07/08/2014

VIENNA, Va.—The Central Station Alarm Association has named COPS Monitoring the winner of the CSAA 2014 Excellence Award for central station of the year, according to a new release. The honor was bestowed at ESX 2014 in Nashville, Tenn.

CSAA launches pair of surveys

 - 
07/01/2014

VIENNA, Va.—The Central Station Alarm Association has launched a pair of surveys, one dealing with the proposed “Alarm Monitoring Model Licensing Act,” and another with industry compensation practices, according to separate news releases from the CSAA.

Security Partners deploys new video verification service from Alarm.com

The residential service is based on image sensors, which detect motion and serve video clips to central stations in an alarm event
 - 
06/04/2014

LANCASTER, Pa.—Security Partners, a wholesale monitoring company based here, is optimistic about the potential of video verification in the residential market. That’s one reason they’re an early adopter of a new video verification service from Alarm.com, an interactive services company with an established presence in the home.

Toronto police considering non-response

 - 
Wednesday, June 4, 2014

Toronto, the largest city in Canada, is mulling the possibility of not responding to private alarms, citing a false alarm rate that looks bad even within that context.

According to a report from the Toronto Star, just 300 of the 20,000 private alarm calls Toronto police responded to in 2012 turned out to be legitimate. As a result, an internal police steering committee is reviewing the cost-savings that could be reaped by scaling back on alarm response (among other services), the report said.  

By doing so, the committee estimates the police force could realize $613,222 in savings, according to the report. That amounts to 10,960 officer hours.

Additionally, the committee recommended police stop taking reports on lost or stolen property whose value does not exceed $500.

From a law enforcement perspective, it’s sensible to do away with writing redundant reports for lost property, particularly when other institutions are better suited to deal with such events. But what could a non-response policy portend for alarm companies who would then have to provide private response services themselves? Not only do companies stand to incur the costs associated with this; they also stand to lose what many in the industry view as the most vital element of the value proposition of an alarm system—the guarantee of police response in the event of a legitimate alarm.  

False alarms (and what to do about them) remain among the most polarizing issues in the alarm industry today. It continues to define, and sometimes roil, the relationship between private alarm companies and law enforcement.

So what’s can be done? The theories about how to mitigate false alarms tend to diverge and dovetail, making the issue especially complex and difficult to navigate, much less reach a conclusion on. Some believe a clear and properly enforced ordinance, bolstered by measures such as cross-zoning and enhanced call verification, will do the trick, with fines for offending alarms helping to offset the losses. Others say private response is the inevitable long-term solution.

Others still, such as PPVAR, believe the relationship between law enforcement and the industry can and should remain intact so long as the alarm installed base evolves technologically and municipalities move toward a verified response approach (that's not to say the industry is in full agreement over what constitutes a verified alarm). The organization also espouses new video verification standards.

The issue continues to be a fraught one, with no definite solution in sight. To be sure, many cities have made great strides with false alarm reduction. But cases such as Toronto are a resounding reminder that there’s room for improvement.

Sequoia pumps $57m into SimpliSafe

 - 
Wednesday, May 28, 2014

In the modern security environment, there’s no shortage of relatively new, tech-savvy companies intent on revising the traditional alarm monitoring business model. That some of these upstart companies, such as Cambridge, Mass.-based SimpliSafe, are now attracting serious outside investment interest is a development that bears watching.

SimpliSafe, which provides wireless security systems and professional monitoring services without long-term contracts, recently partnered with Sequoia, a prominent venture capital firm in Silicon Valley, to raise $57 million. On its website, the company claims to have 100,000 customers.

SimpliSafe describes itself as a “disruptive tech company working to help people live safely,” while touting its in-house maxim that “being safe should be simple.”

Interestingly enough, SimpliSafe doesn’t fit perfectly into the DIY/MIY mold; it’s really more of a hybrid between those types of systems and more traditional security units. A Wall Street Journal blog noted that a SimpliSafe system with sensors and other burglary protection components, along with a hardware package, typically costs about $260. The company also offers monitoring services for $14.99 per month, but doesn’t require customers to purchase them.

In a company blog, Chad Laurans, CEO of SimpliSafe, said the following: “We’ve eliminated unnecessary middlemen, so we can pass the savings onto our customers and pour our resources into product innovation and customer service.”

Down the road, one of the biggest threats to central station RMR could be the proliferation of increasingly sophisticated DIY/MIY systems that unite ease of use and installation with competitive pricing models. As of yet, there’s no clear writing on the wall that says central station RMR will suffer the effects of “disintermediation” at the hands of innovative MIY products. But a $57 million infusion is no small sum for the security industry. It goes without saying that an investment of this scale can be transformative from a product development standpoint.

It will be interesting to see if this pared down version of security and alarm monitoring indeed proves to be disruptive, and if so, how the monitoring industry responds to the challenge. 

UCC names new head of dealer development

 - 
05/27/2014

SAN ANTONIO, Texas—In a move to bolster dealer growth and services, United Central Control, a provider of monitored security services based here, has named Ron Bowden as director of dealer development, according to a news release.

COPS bringing more information to customers' fingertips

The grouped access enhancement allows subscribers to place up to five accounts on test at once from a mobile phone
 - 
05/21/2014

WILLIAMSTOWN, N.J.—COPS Monitoring is enhancing its mobile subscriber access product—called MPower Me—by introducing “grouped access,” which allows customers to view and manage multiple accounts from their smart phones at once.

Pages