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Internet of things

Congress introduces legislation to establish security standards for government devices

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Wednesday, March 13, 2019

Based on analyst firm Gartner’s research, 20.4 billion Internet of Things (IoT) devices will be deployed by 2020; that’s more than double the world’s population! Hackers tend to gravitate toward the weakest link in the security chain, and because more and more IoT devices have questionable defenses, they make easy targets. This has caused the U.S. government to take notice.

To date, there is no national standard for IoT security, leaving it up to each company to decide how they want to security their connected devices. So, on Monday, March 11th, the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives members introduced the Internet of Things Cybersecurity Improvement Act. If passed, this legislation would set minimum security standards for connected devices used by the government in an effort to prevent the federal government from purchasing hacker friendly devices. 

While the legislation won’t set security standards for all IoT companies—just the ones wanting to win federal contracts— it could provide a baseline of best practices for all connected device manufacturers to consider. 

Should the bill pass, here’s what would happen: 

  • Security standards from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), such as secure development, identity management, patching and configuration management, would be required; 
  • NIST would review every five years; 
  • All IoT venders selling to the U.S. government would have a vulnerability disclosure policy, allowing government officials to learn when the devices are open to cyberattacks.

 

Do you think this legislation would compel all connected device makers to adopt these security requirements or just the ones wanting to do business with the government? 

 

Essence notes trends from 2016, makes predictions for 2017

Dealers will find additional revenue streams by harnessing analytics, company says
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01/24/2017

TEL AVIV, Israel—Smart home device provider Essence made some predictions about 2017’s landscape for the Internet of Things.

Tyco invests in Qolsys

Tyco also names Daryl Fogal CTO, releases 'Tyco On'
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11/24/2014

CORK, Ireland—Tyco International on Nov. 21 announced that it is making a strategic investment in Silicon Valley-based home automation solution provider Qolsys.

SSN News Poll: Readers debate central station of future

Readers say business as usual is not an option. Nontraditional services expected to play larger role
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09/03/2014

YARMOUTH, Maine—Though central stations will always hang their hat on the value of their core monitoring service, their transformation into hubs of more than just alarm signals is well underway.

Customer service and the Internet of Things

Readers say diagnostic tools and IT training for technicians is key to customer satisfaction
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06/18/2014

YARMOUTH, Maine—The Internet of Things phenomenon has left few industries untouched, and security is no exception. While the connected home has opened up a virtually limitless frontier for RMR, it has also spawned new demands for training and customer service that companies would do well to consider if they hope to minimize attrition.

VSaaS market worth about $2.39 billion by 2017

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06/03/2014

DALLAS—The global video surveillance as a service market is expected to reach $2.39 billion by 2017, expanding at a CAGR of 31.5 percent from 2012 to 2017, according to a report from MarketsandMarkets, a market research and consulting firm based here.

Affiliated to unveil mobile app for dealers, technicians

It’s also exploring ways to monitor 'non-traditional devices'
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03/19/2014

UNION, N.J.—At its dealer summit in December, Affiliated Monitoring made clear that it was making a concerted push to develop its mobile aspect. The company is about to take another big step in that direction.